Etymology
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overwrought (adj.)

of feelings, imagination, etc., "worked up to too high a pitch, overexcited," 1758, literally "over-worked, worked too hard or too much," from over- + wrought. Earlier it meant "exhausted by work" (1660s), of oxen, etc., as a literal past participle of overwork (v.).

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jack-hammer (n.)
also jackhammer, "portable rock-drill worked by compressed air," 1913, from jack (n.) + hammer (n.). As a verb by 1947. Related: Jack-hammered; jack-hammering.
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chiseled (adj.)

"having sharp outlines" (as though worked with a chisel), 1821, figurative past-participle adjective from chisel (v.).

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rehash (n.)

"old material worked up anew, something concocted from material formerly used," usually of literary productions, 1849, from rehash (v.).

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scull (n.)

kind of short, light, spoon-bladed oar, mid-14c., skulle, a word of unknown origin. The verb, "to propel with one oar worked from the stern," is by 1620s, from the noun. Related: Sculled; sculling.

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decompensation (n.)

"lack or loss of compensation," especially, in medicine, "deterioration of a structure that had worked through compensation," 1900, from de- + compensation.

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umiak (n.)
large Eskimo boat, c. 1743, from Eskimo umiaq "an open skin boat." Said by 18c.-19c. sources to be a "woman's boat," as opposed to the kayak, which was worked exclusively by men.
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pressroom (n.)

1680s, "a room where printing presses are worked," from press (n.) + room (n.). By 1902 as "room (in a courthouse, etc.) reserved for the use of reporters."

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Bering 

strait and sea between Alaska and Siberia, named for Danish explorer Vitus Bering, who worked for Peter the Great and led the first European expedition to sight Alaska, in 1741.

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treadle (n.)
"lever worked by foot," c. 1400, from Old English tredel "step, stair, sole of the foot," from tredan "to tread" (see tread (v.)) + instrumental suffix -el (1). Compare handle (n.).
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