Etymology
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bon mot (n.)

"witticism, clever or witty saying," 1735, French, literally "good word," from bon "good" + mot "remark, short speech," literally "word" (12c.), from Vulgar Latin *muttum, from Latin muttire "to mutter, mumble, murmur" (see mutter (v.)). The plural is bons mots.

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sub voce 
Latin, literally "under the word or heading." A common dictionary reference, usually abbreviated s.v.
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viva voce 
also viva-voce, "by word of mouth," 1580s, Latin, literally "living-voice," ablative of viva vox.
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capital letter (n.)
late 14c.; see capital (adj.). So called because it is at the "head" of a sentence or word.
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pine-cone (n.)

"strobilus of a pine tree," 1690s, from pine (n.) + cone (n.). An earlier word for it was pine nut (Old English pinhnyte); also see pineapple.

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pina colada (n.)

"long drink made with pineapple juice, rum, and coconut," 1923, from Spanish piña colada, literally "strained pineapple." The first word was originally "pine-cone" (and formerly pinna), from Latin pinea (see pineapple). Second word ultimately is from Latin colare "to strain" (see colander). Ayto ("Diner's Dictionary") writes that the drink probably originated in Puerto Rico and "enjoyed a certain vogue in the mid to late 1970s," as evidenced by a certain song.

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gefilte fish (n.)
1892, gefüllte Fisch, not a species but a loaf made from various kinds of ground fish and other ingredients; the first word is Yiddish, from German gefüllte "stuffed," from füllen "to fill" (from PIE root *pele- (1) "to fill").
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in totidem verbis 
Latin phrase, "in just so many words," that is, "in these very words," from demonstrative of Latin totus "whole, entire" (see total (adj.)) + ablative plural of verbum "word" (see verb).
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part of speech (n.)

"a word viewed as a constituent member of a sentence," c. 1500, translating Latin pars orationis (see parse). The parts of speech are: Noun, adjective, pronoun, verb, adverb, preposition, conjunction, and interjection. Sometimes article and participle are counted among them.

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gila monster (n.)

"venomous lizard of the American southwest" (Heloderma suspectum), 1877, American English, from Gila River, which runs through its habitat in Arizona. The river name probably is from an Indian language, but it is unknown now which one, or what the word meant in it.

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