Etymology
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wonder (n.)
Old English wundor "marvelous thing, miracle, object of astonishment," from Proto-Germanic *wundran (source also of Old Saxon wundar, Middle Dutch, Dutch wonder, Old High German wuntar, German wunder, Old Norse undr), of unknown origin. In Middle English it also came to mean the emotion associated with such a sight (late 13c.). To be no wonder was in Old English. The original wonder drug (1939) was Sulfanilamide.
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wonder (v.)
Old English wundrian "be astonished," also "admire; make wonderful, magnify," from the source of wonder (n.). Cognate with Dutch wonderen, Old High German wuntaron, German wundern. Sense of "entertain some doubt or curiosity" is late 13c. Related: Wondered; wondering.

Reflexive use (It wonders me that "I wonder why ...") was common in Middle English and as late as Tindale (1533), and is said to survive in Yorkshire/Lincolnshire. In Pennsylvania German areas it is idiomatic from German das wundert mich.
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wonder-worker (n.)
1590s, from wonder (n.) + worker, translating Greek thaumatourgos. Old English had wundorweorc "miracle."
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wonderland (n.)
"imaginary realm," 1787, from wonder (n.) + land (n.).
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wonderful (adj.)
late Old English wunderfoll; see wonder (n.) + -ful. Related: Wonderfully.
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wondrous (adj.)
c. 1500, from Middle English wonders (adj.), early 14c., originally genitive of wonder (n.), with suffix altered by influence of marvelous, etc. As an adverb from 1550s. Related: Wondrously; wondrousness.
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wunderkind (n.)
child prodigy (especially in music), 1883 in English (earlier as a German word in German contexts), from German Wunderkind, literally "wonder-child." For first element see wonder (n.). Second is German Kind "child" (see kind (n.)).
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agape (adv.)
"with the mouth wide open" (as in wonder), 1660s, from a- (1) + gape (v.).
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thaumaturge (n.)

"wonder-worker," 1715, from Medieval Latin thaumaturgus, from Greek thaumatourgos "wonder-working; conjurer," from thauma (genitive thaumatos) "wonder, astonishment; wondrous thing," literally "a thing to look at," from root of theater, + -ourgia "a working," from ergon "work" (from PIE root *werg- "to do").

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