Etymology
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won 
past tense and past participle of win (v.).
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wonton (n.)
also won ton, 1948, from Cantonese wan t'an, Mandarin hun tun "stuffed dumpling."
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winning (n.)
"thing gained or won," late 14c., verbal noun from win (v.). Related: Winnings.
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formulate (v.)
"to express in a formula," 1837, from formula + -ate (2). Won out over formulize (1842); formularize (1845). Related: Formulated; formulating.
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external (adj.)

early 15c., "overt;" by 1590s as "situated or lying outside," from Latin externus "outside, outward" (from exterus; see exterior) + -al (1). This version won out over exterial. Related: Externally.

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radar (n.)

"electronic system for locating and tracking objects at a distance by means of radio waves," 1941, acronym (more or less) from radio detecting and ranging. The U.S. choice, it won out over British radiolocation. Figurative from 1950.

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rubber (n.2)

"deciding match" in a game or contest, usually a third where each has won one, 1590s, a word of unknown origin and signification; even the original form is uncertain. Not obviously connected to rubber (n.1). 

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parlay (n.)

1701, parloi, a term in the card game faro involving applying money won to a continuing bet, from French paroli, from Italian parole (Neapolitan paroli) "words, promises," plural of parolo (see parole (n.)). Verbal meaning "exploit to advantage" is by 1942.

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sweepstakes (n.)
"prize won in a race or contest," 1773, from Middle English swepestake "one who sweeps or wins all the stakes in a game" (late 14c. as a surname or nickname; late 15c. as the name of one of the King's ships), from swepen "to sweep" (see sweep (v.)) + stake (n.2). Meaning "any race for stakes contributed" is from 1862.
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hypocritical (adj.)

"of, pertaining to, or proceeding from hypocrisy," 1540s (implied in hypocritically), from hypocritic, which was used in the same sense, + -al (1). It won out over hypocritish (1520s), hypocritic (1530s). Middle English used simple hypocrite as the adjective (c. 1400) as well as the noun.

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