Etymology
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within (adv., prep.)
Old English wiðinnan "within, from within," literally "against the inside," see with + in.
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eso- 
word-forming element meaning" within," from Greek eso "within" (see esoteric).
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intra-genic (adj.)
also intragenic, "occurring within a gene," 1937, from intra- "within" + gene + -ic.
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intra-peritoneal (adj.)

also intraperitoneal, "within the cavity of the peritoeum," 1835, from intra- "within" + peritoneal (see peritoneum).

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intravenous (adj.)
"in or occurring within a vein," 1847, from intra- "within, inside" + Latin venous, from vena "vein" (see vein). Related: Intravenously.
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indoor (adj.)

also in-door, 1670s, opposed to outdoor, contracted from within door; the form indoors is attested from 1759 (within-doors is from 1750); as an adverb from 1801.

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endo- 

word-forming element meaning "inside, within, internal," from Greek endon "in, within" (from PIE *en-do-, extended form of root *en "in").

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introvert (v.)

"turn within, direct inward," 1650s, from Latin intro "inward, within" (see intro-) + vertere "to turn" (from PIE root *wer- (2) "to turn, bend").

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intramural (adj.)
1846, "within the walls, being within the walls or boundaries" (of a city, building, etc.), from intra- "within" + Latin muralis "pertaining to a wall," from murus "wall" (see mural). Equivalent to Late Latin intramuranus. Originally in English in reference to burials of the dead; in reference to college activities from 1871 (first at Columbia).
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endogenous (adj.)
"growing or proceeding from within," especially with reference to a class of plants including cereals, palms, plantains, etc., 1822, from endo- "within" + -genous "producing."
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