Etymology
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willing (adj.)
early 14c., present-participle adjective from will (v.1). Old English had -willendliche in compounds. Related: Willingly; willingness.
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unwilling (adj.)

early 15c., altered from or re-formed to replace Middle English unwilland, from Old English unwillende; see un- (1) "not" + willing (adj.). Also see -ing (2). Related: Unwillingly; unwillingness.

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obedient (adj.)

c. 1200, "willing to serve (someone); willing to fulfill an obligation," from Old French obedient "obedient" (11c.), from Latin oboedientem (nominative oboediens) "obedient, compliant," present participle of oboedire "to obey" (see obey).

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waggish (adj.)
"willing to make a fool of oneself, and fond of doing so to others," 1580s, from wag (n.) + -ish. Related: Waggishly; waggishness.
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sexpot (n.)
"erotically willing and desirable female," 1929, from sex (n.) + pot (n.1), perhaps suggested by fleshpot.
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obliging (adj.)

of persons, dispositions, etc., "willing to do service or favors," 1630s, present-participle adjective from oblige. Related: Obligingly.

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nolens volens 

Latin, "willing or unwilling," 1590s, from present participles of nolle "be unwilling" (from ne "not" + velle "will") + velle "to wish, will" (see will (v.)).

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Deo volente 

1767, Latin, "God willing," that is, "if nothing prevents it, if it is meant to be," a sort of verbal knock on wood, from ablative of Deus "God" (see Zeus) + ablative of volentem, present participle of velle "to wish, will" (see will (v.)). Often abbreviated D.V.

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involuntary (adj.)
mid-15c., from Late Latin involuntarius "involuntary, unwilling," from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + Latin voluntarius "willing, voluntarily" (see voluntary). Related: Involuntarily.
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Clytaemnestra 
also Clytemnestra, wife and murderess of Agamemnon, from Greek Klytaimnestra, from klytos "celebrated, heard of" (see loud) + mnester "wooer, suitor," literally "willing to mind, mindful of," related to mnasthai "to remember," from PIE root *men- (1) "to think."
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