Etymology
Advertisement
Advertisement
bad (n.)
late 14c., "evil, wickedness," from bad (adj.).
Related entries & more 
impiety (n.)
mid-14c., from Old French impieté "impiety, wickedness" (12c.) or directly from Latin impietatem (nominative impietas) "irreverence, ungodliness; disloyalty, treason," noun of quality from impius "irreverent" (see impious).
Related entries & more 
obduracy (n.)

"stubbornness," especially "state of being hardened against moral influences, rebellious persistence in wickedness," 1590s, from obdurate + abstract noun suffix -cy.

Related entries & more 
pravity (n.)

"depravity, evil or corrupt state, wickedness," 1540s, from Latin pravitas "crookedness, distortion, deformity; impropriety, perverseness," from pravus "wrong, bad," literally "crooked," a word of unknown etymology.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
mischance (n.)

"mishap, ill-luck, disaster," c. 1300, from Old French mescheance "misfortune, mishap, accident; wickedness, malice," from Vulgar Latin *minuscadentiam; see mis- (2) + chance (n.). Now usually "bad luck;" formerly much stronger: "calamity, disaster, affliction."

Related entries & more 
perversity (n.)

early 15c., perversite, "wickedness," from Old French perversité "depravity, degeneracy" (12c.), from Latin perversitatem (nominative perversitas) "forwardness, untowardness," from perversus (see perverse). From 1520s as "perverse character, disposition, or conduct."

Related entries & more 
enormity (n.)
late 15c., "transgression, crime; irregularity," from Old French enormité "extravagance, atrocity, heinous sin," from Latin enormitatem (nominative enormitas) "hugeness, vastness; irregularity," from enormis "irregular, huge" (see enormous). Meaning "extreme wickedness" in English attested from 1560s. The notion is of that which surpasses the endurable limits of order, right, decency. Sense of "hugeness" (1765 in English) is etymological but to prevent misunderstanding probably best avoided in favor of enormousness, though this, too, originally meant "immeasurable wickedness" (1718) and didn't start to mean "hugeness" until c. 1800.
Related entries & more 
adversity (n.)
c. 1200, aduersite "condition of misfortune, hardship, difficulty, distress," from Old French adversite, aversite (Modern French aversité) "adversity, calamity, misfortune; hostility, wickedness, malice" (Modern French adversité), from Latin adversitatem (nominative adversitas) "opposition," from adversus "turned against, hostile" (see adverse).
Related entries & more 
iniquity (n.)
c. 1300, "hostility, malevolence; a hostile action," from Old French iniquité, iniquiteit "wickedness; unfavorable situation" (12c.), from Latin iniquitatem (nominative iniquitas) "unequalness, unevenness," figuratively "unfavorableness, unfairness, injustice," noun of quality from iniquus "unjust, unequal; slanting, steep," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + aequus "just, equal" (see equal (adj.)).

For the vowel change in the Latin compound, see acquisition. Meaning "evil, wickedness" is from late 14c. Old Iniquity (1610s) was a comic or buffoonish character in old morality plays, representing vice.
Related entries & more