Etymology
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whose (pron.)
genitive of who; from Old English hwæs, genitive of hwa "who," from PIE root *kwo-, stem of relative and interrogative pronouns.
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rantallion (n.)
"One whose scrotum is so relaxed as to be longer than his penis, i. e. whose shot pouch is longer than the barrel of his piece." ["Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue," Grose, 1785]
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cabinet-maker (n.)
"one whose occupation is the making of household furniture," 1680s, from cabinet + maker.
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copyist (n.)

"one whose occupation is to transcribe documents," 1690s, from copy (n.) + -ist. Earlier was copist (1580s).

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rat-catcher (n.)

"one whose business is the catching of rats, a ratter," 1590s, from rat (n.) + catcher.

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optometrist (n.)

"one whose profession is to measure the range and power of vision," 1903; see optometry + -ist.

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showgirl (n.)
"actress whose role is decorative rather than histrionic" [OED], 1836, from show (v.) + girl.
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bookbinder (n.)
"one whose occupation is the binding of books," late 14c, from book (n.) + binder. Related: Bookbindery.
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dressmaker (n.)

also dress-maker, "one whose occupation is the making of articles of feminine attire," 1803, from dress (n.) + maker.

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dyer (n.)

"one whose occupation is to dye cloths, skins, etc.," mid-14c. (mid-13c. as a surname), agent noun from dye (v.).

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