Etymology
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whoops 
exclamation of dismay, 1925; see oops.
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oops (interj.)

"a natural exclamation" [OED] of surprise at doing something awkward, attested from 1933 (compare whoops).

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jubilation (n.)

late 14c., from Old French jubilacion "jubilation, rejoicing," and directly from Late Latin iubilationem (nominative iubilatio) "a shouting for joy," noun of action from past-participle stem of iubilare "to let out whoops, shout for joy" (see jubilant).

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jubilant (adj.)
1660s (Milton), from Latin iubilantem (nominative iubilans), present participle of iubilare "to let out whoops," in Christian writers, "to shout for joy," related to iubilum "wild shout," from Proto-Italic *iu, an exclamation of joy that probably was in Proto-Indo-European (cognates: Greek iu, an interjection of amazement, iuge "crying;" Middle High German ju, juch, an exclamation of joy; Dutch juichen, Old Norse yla, English yowl). With ending as in sibilant. Related: Jubilantly.
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