Etymology
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whom (pron.)
objective case of who, Old English hwam (Proto-Germanic *hwam), dative form of hwa (from PIE root *kwo-, stem of relative and interrogative pronouns). Ungrammatical use of who form whom is attested from c. 1300.
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*kwo- 
also *kwi-, Proto-Indo-European root, stem of relative and interrogative pronouns.

It forms all or part of: cheese (n.2) "a big thing;" cue (n.1) "stage direction;" either; hidalgo; how; kickshaw; neither; neuter; qua; quality; quandary; quantity; quasar; quasi; quasi-; query; quib; quibble; quiddity; quidnunc; quip; quodlibet; quondam; quorum; quote; quotidian; quotient; ubi; ubiquity; what; when; whence; where; whether; which; whither; who; whoever; whom; whose; why.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit kah "who, which;" Avestan ko, Hittite kuish "who;" Latin quis/quid "in what respect, to what extent; how, why," qua "where, which way," qui/quae/quod "who, which;" Lithuanian kas "who;" Old Church Slavonic kuto, Russian kto "who;" Old Irish ce, Welsh pwy "who;" Old English hwa, hwæt, hwær, etc.
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payee (n.)

"person to whom money is paid," 1758, from pay (v.) + -ee.

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warrantee (n.)
"person to whom a warranty is given," 1706, from warrant (v.) + -ee.
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addressee (n.)
"one to whom anything is addressed," 1810; see address (v.) + -ee.
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licensee (n.)
"one to whom a licence is granted," 1837, from license (v.) + -ee.
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vendee (n.)
"person to whom something is sold," 1540s; see vend (v.) + -ee.
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creditor (n.)

mid-15c., "one to whom any return is due or payable, one to whom money is owed," from Anglo-French creditour, Old French creditor (early 14c.), from Latin creditor "truster; lender," from creditus, past participle of credere "to believe" (see credo).

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concessionaire (n.)

"person to whom a privilege or concession has been granted," 1848, from French concessionaire "person to whom a concession has been granted," from concession, from Latin concessionem "an allowing" (see concession). Native form concessionary is attested from 1854; American English concessioner is from 1899.

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