Etymology
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whimper (v.)
1510s, probably of imitative origin, or from German wimmern "to whimper, moan." Related: Whimpered; whimpering. The noun is first recorded c. 1700.
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wimp (n.)
1920 (but not attested again until 1960), perhaps a clipped form of whimper (cf whimp, 1540s), perhaps influenced by J. Wellington Wimpy, comparatively unaggressive character in "Popeye" comics.
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bang (n.)

1540s, "heavy, resounding blow;" see bang (v.). Meaning "loud, sudden explosive noise" is by 1855.

This is the way the world ends
Not with a bang but a whimper
[T.S. Eliot, from "Hollow Men," 1925]
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