Etymology
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where (adv.)

Old English hwær, hwar "at what place," from Proto-Germanic adverb *hwar (source also of Old Saxon hwar, Old Norse hvar, Old Frisian hwer, Middle Dutch waer, Old High German hwar, German wo, Gothic hvar "where"), equivalent to Latin cur, from PIE root *kwo-, stem of relative and interrogative pronouns. Where it's at attested from 1903.

It has figured in a great many prepositional and adverbial compounds through the years; in addition to the ones listed in this dictionary (whereas, wherefore, whereabouts, etc.) English has or had whereagainst, wherefrom, wherehence, whereinsoever, whereinto, wheremid, whereout, whereover, whereso, wheresoever, wherethrough, whereto, whereunder, whereuntil.

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whereabout (adv.)
"near what place," early 14c. as an interrogatory word, from where + about.
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wherewithal (adv.)

"means by which," 1530s, from where + withal. The noun is attested by 1809.

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whereon (adv.)

"on which," c. 1200, from where (in the sense of "in which position or circumstances") + on (adv.).

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whereat (adv.)

"at what, at which," mid-13c., from where (in the sense of "in which position or circumstances") + at.

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whereby (adv.)

"by what, by which," c. 1200, from where (in the sense of "in which position or circumstances") + by.

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whereupon (conj.)

"upon which or whom," c. 1300, from where (in the sense of "in which position or circumstances") + upon.

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wherewith (adv.)

"with which, that with which," c. 1200, from where (in the sense of "in which position or circumstances") + with.

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whereas (adv.)

mid-14c., "where;" early 15c. as a conjunction, "in consideration of the fact that, considering that things are so; while on the contrary," from where (in the sense of "in which position or circumstances") + as.

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