Etymology
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whatever (pron.)
mid-14c., "what in the world," emphatic of what, with ever. From late 14c. as "anything at all; all of; no matter what or who." From late 14c. as an adjective, "any sort of, any, every; no matter what, regardless of what." From 1870 as "whatever may be the cause, at any event," which could be the source of the modern teen slang dismissive use.
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whatsoever (pron.)
"of whatever nature, kind, or sort," mid-13c., quuat-so-euere, from whatso "whatever" (c. 1200; see what), an emphatic referring to things, + ever. A double intensive of what. As an adjective from mid-15c.
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disencumber (v.)

"to free from whatever burdens, hampers, or impedes," 1590s, from Old French desencombrer;" see dis- + encumber. Related: Disencumbered; disencumbering.

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wherever (adv.)

"at whatever place," late 13c., ware euere, from where + ever. Originally an emphatic extension of where. Meaning "at any place, at some place or another" is from 1660s.

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bricolage (n.)

term used in arts and literature, "work made from available things," by 1966, via Lévi-Strauss, from French bricolage, from bricoler "to fiddle, tinker" and, by extension, "make creative and resourceful use of whatever materials are to hand (regardless of their original purpose)," 16c., from bricole (14c.).

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globalism (n.)

used from c. 1946 in a variety of senses, both by those supporting and those opposed to whatever it was: American intervention in foreign conflicts, a global foreign policy; supremacy of global institutions over national ones; a worldwide extension of capitalist market systems; from global + -ism. Related: Globalist.

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sedative (adj.)
"tending to calm or soothe," early 15c., from Medieval Latin sedativus "calming, allaying," from sedat-, past participle stem of sedare, causative of sedere "to sit," from PIE root *sed- (1) "to sit." The noun derivative meaning "a sedative drug" is attested from 1785. Hence, "whatever soothes or allays."
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pot-hunter (n.)

 "one who shoots whatever he finds; one who hunts or fishes for food or profit not for sport, one who kills regardless of the season, waste of game, or pleasure involved," 1781, from pot (n.1) + hunter. Related: Pot-hunting (1808).

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freestyle (n.)
also free-style, 1912, in swimming, in reference to a distance race in which the swimmers may use whatever stroke they choose; 1950 in general use, from free + style. The most common stroke is the front crawl, as this is generally the fastest. As an adjective, from 1957; as a verb, by 1970 (in martial arts).
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cherchez la femme 
French, literally "seek the woman," on the notion that a woman is the cause for whatever crime has been committed, first used by Alexandre Dumas père in "Les Mohicans de Paris" (1864) in the form cherchons la femme. French chercher is from Latin circare, in Late Latin "to wander hither and thither," from circus "circle" (see circus).
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