Etymology
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western (adj.)
"toward or of the west," late Old English westerne "western, westerly, coming from the west," from west + -erne, suffix denoting direction. The noun meaning "book or movie about the Old West" is first attested 1909. Westerner is from 1837 as "person from the U.S. West," 1880 as "Euro-American," as opposed to Oriental.
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westerly (adv.)
late 15c., "in a westerly direction; facing toward the west," from Middle English wester (adj.) "western" (mid-14c.), from Old English westra, variant of westerne (see western) + -ly (2). As an adjective, "coming from the west," 1570s. Contradictory sense of "going to the west" attested by 1630s.
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westernize (adj.)

also westernise, 1837, originally in reference to the U.S. West, from western + -ize.

Emigrants from Europe have brought the peculiarities of the nations and countries from whence they have originated, but are fast losing their national manners and feelings, and, to use a provincial term, will soon become "westernized." [J.M. Peck, "A New Guide for Emigrants to the West," Boston, 1837]

In reference to Europeanizing of Middle Eastern or Asian places and persons, from 1867. Related: Westernized; westernizing.

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occidental (adj.)

c. 1400, "to, of, or in the west (of the sky or the earth)," from Old French occidental (14c.) and directly from Latin occidentalis "western," from occidentem (see occident). Meaning "of, pertaining to, or characteristic of the western regions of the earth (especially Western Europe and its derivative civilizations in the western hemisphere" (opposed to oriental), 1550s. As a capitalized noun meaning "a Western person" (opposed to Oriental) it is attested from 1823. Related: Occidentalism; occidentalist.

Those who inhabit (to us) the western regions of the world, and to express whom the English language wants a word, the opposite of Orientals; though word-coining be much condemned, I will venture to employ Occidentalsas substantive and say, (etc.) ["The Bee," 1823] 
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Holy Land 
"western Palestine, Judaea," late 13c., translating Medieval Latin terra sancta (11c.).
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Gujarati 
from Gujarat, state in western India, Hindi, from Sanskrit Gurjara.
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Pannonia 

ancient name of the region roughly corresponding now to western Hungary, from Latin, from Greek Pannonia. Related: Pannonian; Pannonic.

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cabana (n.)
"a hut or shelter," 1898, western U.S., from American Spanish cognate of cabin (q.v.).
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Kyrgyz 
also Kirghiz, Turkic people of western Central Asia, 1650s; their name is of disputed origin.
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