Etymology
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Mae West 
type of inflatable life jacket, 1940, military slang, in reference to the screen name of the buxom U.S. film star (1892-1980).
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Yoruba 
west Nigerian people, also the name of their language.
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Akan 
people and language of West Africa (Ghana and surrounding regions), 1690s, a native name.
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Bacardi 
1921, name for a brand of West Indian rum produced by Compania Ron Bacardi, originally of Cuba.
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Nigeria 

West African nation, named for river Niger, which runs through it, + country name ending -ia. Related: Nigerian.

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Doctor Martens 
type of heavy walking boots, 1977 (use claimed from 1965), trademark name taken out by Herbert Funck and Klaus Martens of West Germany.
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Hispaniola 
West Indian island, from Spanish la isla española "the Spanish island" (not "little Spain"); the name is said to have been given by Columbus in 1492.
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Caribbean (adj.)
"of or pertaining to the Caribs," also "of the sea between the West Indies and the South American mainland," by 1750s, from Carib, indigenous people's name for themselves, + -ean.
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Senegal 

West African nation, independent from 1960, formerly a French colony, by 1783, named for the river through it, which is named perhaps from a local word meaning "navigable." Related: Senegalese.

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Wesleyan (adj.)
"pertaining to Wesley," 1771, in reference to John Wesley (1703-1791), founder of Methodism. The surname is from various places in England named West Leigh (or some variant). Related: Wesleyanism.
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