Etymology
Advertisement
Eugene 
masc. proper name, from French Eugène, from Latin Eugenius, from Greek Eugenios, literally "nobility of birth," from eugenes "well-born" (see eugenics).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Eudora 

fem. proper name, Greek, literally "generous," fem. of eudoros, from eu "well, good" (see eu-) + dōron "gift" (from PIE root *do- "to give").

Related entries & more 
Eunice 

fem. proper name, from Latinized form of Greek Eunikē, literally "victorious," from eu "good, well" (see eu-) + nikē "victory" (see Nike).

Related entries & more 
Ulysses 
Latin name for Odysseus, from Latin Ulysses, Ulixes. Famous for wandering as well as craftiness and ability at deceit. For -d- to -l- alteration, see lachrymose.
Related entries & more 
Eustace 
masc. proper name, from Old French Eustace (Modern French Eustache), from Latin Eustachius, probably from Greek eustakhos "fruitful," from eu "well, good" (see eu-) + stakhys "ear (of grain);" see spike (n.1).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Wellington (n.)
boot so called from 1817, for Arthur, 1st Duke of Wellington (1769-1852), who also in his lifetime had a style of coat, hat, and trousers named for him as well as a variety of apple and pine tree.
Related entries & more 
Euphrosyne 

name of one of the three Graces in Greek mythology, via Latin, from Greek Euphrosyne, literally "mirth, merriment," from euphron "cheerful, merry, of a good mind," from eu "well, good" (see eu-) + phrēn (genitive phrenos) "heart, mind" (see phreno-).

Related entries & more 
Sydney 
Australian city, founded 1788 and named for British Home Secretary Thomas Townshend, 1st Viscount Sydney (1733-1800). The family name (also Sidney) is literally "dweller by the well-watered land," from Old English sid "side" + ieg "island."
Related entries & more 
Lego 
1954, proprietary name (in use since 1934, according to the company), from Danish phrase leg godt "play well." The founder, Danish businessman Ole Kirk Christiansen (1891-1958), didn't realize until later that the word meant "I study" or "I put together" in Latin.
Related entries & more 
Euclidean (adj.)
1650s, "of or pertaining to Euclid" (Greek Eukleides), c. 300 B.C.E. geometer of Alexandria. Now often used in contrast to alternative models based on rejection of some of his axioms. His name in Greek means "renowned, glorious," from eu "well" (see eu-) + kleos "fame" (see Clio).
Related entries & more