Etymology
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weft (n.)
"threads which run across the web from side to side," Old English weft, wefta "weft," related to wefan "to weave," from Proto-Germanic *weftaz (see weave (v.)).
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woof (n.1)
"weft, texture, fabric," Old English owef, from o- "on" + wefan "to weave" (see weave). With unetymological w- by influence of warp or weft.
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heft (n.)
mid-15c., "weight, heaviness, quality of weight," from heave (v.) on analogy of thieve/theft, weave/weft, etc. Also influenced by heft, obsolete past participle of heave.
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slay (n.)
"instrument on a weaver's loom to beat up the weft," Old English slæ, slea, slahae, from root meaning "strike" (see slay (v.)), so called from "striking" the web together. Hence the surname Slaymaker "maker of slays."
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poplin (n.)

type of corded fabric having a silk warp and a weft of wool heavier than the silk, 1710, from French papeline "cloth of fine silk and worsted" (1660s), probably from Provençal papalino, fem. of papalin "of or belonging to the pope," from Medieval Latin papalis "papal" (see papal). The reference is to Avignon, papal residence during the schism 1309-1408 (and regarded as a papal town until 1791), which also was a center of silk manufacture. Influenced in English by Poperinghe, town in Flanders where the fabric was made (but from 18c. the primary source was Ireland).

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