Etymology
Advertisement
weed (v.)
"to clear the ground of weeds," late Old English weodian "to weed," from the source of weed (n.). Figurative use by c. 1400. Related: Weeded; weeding; weeder.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
weed (n.)
"plant not valued for use or beauty," Old English weod, uueod "grass, herb, weed," from Proto-Germanic *weud- (source also of Old Saxon wiod, East Frisian wiud), of unknown origin. Also applied to trees that grow abundantly. Meaning "tobacco" is from c. 1600; that of "marijuana" is from 1920s. The chemical weed-killer is attested by 1885.
Related entries & more 
loco-weed (n.)
plant of the U.S. West, noted for its effect on cattle and horses that ate it, 1877; see loco (adj.) "crazy" + weed (n.).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
tumbleweed (n.)
also tumble-weed, 1881, from tumble (v.) + weed (n.).
Related entries & more 
neckweed (n.)

old slang for "hemp," 1560s, from it being used for making a hangman's noose; from neck (n.) + weed (n.).

Related entries & more 
milkweed (n.)
1590s, from milk (n.) + weed (n.); used in reference to various plants whose juice resembles milk.
Related entries & more 
hogweed (n.)
1707, from hog (n.) + weed (n.); used variously in different places of plants eaten by hogs or deemed fit only for them.
Related entries & more