Etymology
Advertisement
webster (n.)

"a weaver," Old English webbestre "a female weaver," from web (q.v.) + fem. suffix -ster. Noah Webster's dictionary, typically American and execrable for etymology, was first published 1828.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
spinster (n.)

mid-14c., "female spinner of thread," from Middle English spinnen "spin fibers into thread" (see spin (v.)) + -stere, feminine suffix (see -ster). Unmarried women were supposed to occupy themselves with spinning, hence the word came to be "the legal designation in England of all unmarried women from a viscount's daughter downward" [Century Dictionary] in documents from 1600s to early 1900s, and by 1719 the word was being used generically for "woman still unmarried and beyond the usual age for it."

Spinster, a terme, or an addition in our Common Law, onely added in Obligations, Euidences, and Writings, vnto maids vnmarried. [John Minsheu, "Ductor in Linguas," 1617]

Strictly in reference to those who spin, spinster also was used of both sexes (compare webster, Baxter, brewster) and so a double-feminine form emerged, spinstress "a female spinner" (1640s), which by 1716 also was being used for "a maiden lady." Related: Spinsterhood.

Related entries & more 
nose-bleed (n.)

also nosebleed, "a discharge of blood from the nose, epistaxis," 1839 (Webster), from nose (n.) + bleed (n.). Also a common name of the yarrow and watercress (15c., compare nasturtium).

Related entries & more 
mambo (n.)

popular dance (like the rhumba but livelier), 1947, from American Spanish mambo, said by Webster to be from Haitian creole word for "voodoo priestess."

Related entries & more 
forwards (adv.)
c. 1400, from forward (adv.) + adverbial genitive -s. British English until mid-20c. preserved the distinction between forward and forwards, the latter expressing "a definite direction viewed in contrast with other directions." In American English, however, forward prevails in all senses since Webster (1832) damned forwards as "a corruption."
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
raising (n.)

mid-14c., "an act of elevating," verbal noun from raise (v.). Specifically in American English, "the erecting of a building," by 1650s.

RAISING. In New England and the Northern States, the operation or work of setting up the frame of a building. [Webster, 1830]
Related entries & more 
redemptioner (n.)

"one who is or may be redeemed or set at liberty," specifically, in U.S. history, "indentured servant," 1775, from redemption + -er (1).

REDEMPTIONER. One who redeems himself or purchases his release from debt or obligation to the master of a ship by his services; or one whose services are sold to pay the expenses of his passage to America. [Webster, 1830]
Related entries & more 
brown-nose (v.)

also brownnose, 1939, American English colloquial, said to be military slang originally, from brown (adj.) + nose (n.), "from the implication that servility is tantamount to having one's nose in the anus of the person from whom advancement is sought" [Webster, 1961, quoted in OED]. Related: Brown-noser (by 1945, early citations suggest military slang), brown-nosing (by 1950). British bumsucker "sycophant" is attested from 1877.

Related entries & more 
cosplay (n.)

"practice or hobby of dressing as a character from a movie, book, or video game, especially one from Japanese manga and anime," 1993, according to Merriam-Webster, from costume (n.) + play (n.), based on a Japanese word formed from the same English elements and alleged to date from 1983. Also used as a verb.

Related entries & more 
tackle (v.)
mid-14c., "entangle, involve," from tackle (n.). Sense of "to furnish (a ship) with tackles" is from c. 1400; meaning "to harness a horse" is recorded from 1714. The meaning "lay hold of, come to grips with, attack" is attested from 1828, described by Webster that year as "a common popular use of the word in New England, though not elegant;" figurative sense of "try to deal with" (a task or problem) is from 1840. The verb in the sporting sense first recorded 1867, "to seize and stop." Related: Tackled; tackling.
Related entries & more