Etymology
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weary (v.)
Old English wergian "to be or become tired" (intransitive), gewergian "to exhaust, to make tired" (transitive), from the source of weary (adj.). Related: Wearied; wearying.
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weary (adj.)
Old English werig "tired, exhausted; miserable, sad," related to worian "to wander, totter," from Proto-Germanic *worigaz (source also of Old Saxon worig "weary," Old High German wuorag "intoxicated"), of unknown origin.
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wearisome (adj.)
mid-15c., "weary," also "causing weariness," from weary + -some (1).
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unwearied (adj.)
mid-13c., from Old English ungewerigod, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of weary (v.).
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tire (v.1)
"to weary," also "to become weary," Old English teorian (Kentish tiorian) "to fail, cease; become weary; make weary, exhaust," of uncertain origin; according to Watkins possibly from Proto-Germanic *teuzon, from a suffixed form of PIE root *deu- (1) "to lack, be wanting." Related: Tired; tiring.
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defatigable (adj.)
Origin and meaning of defatigable

"liable to be wearied," 1650s, from defatigate (v.), 1550s, from Latin defatigatus, past participle of defatigare "to weary, tire out, exhaust with labor," from de "utterly, down, away" (see de-) + fatigare "to weary" (see fatigue (n.)). Also see indefatigable.

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alas (interj.)

mid-13c., from Old French ha, las (later French hélas), from ha "ah" + las "unfortunate," originally "tired, weary," from Latin lassus "weary" (from PIE root *‌‌lē- "to let go, slacken"). At first an expression of weariness rather than woe.

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tired (adj.)
"exhausted, fatigued, weary," early 15c., past-participle adjective from tire (v.).
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lassitude (n.)

early 15c., from Latin lassitudinem (nominative lassitudo) "faintness, weariness," from lassus "faint, tired, weary," from PIE *led-to-, suffixed form of *led- "slow, weary" (source also of Old English læt "sluggish, slow;" see late (adj.)), from PIE root *‌‌lē- "to let go, slacken."

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jade (v.)
"to weary, tire out, make dull," c. 1600, from jade (n.2). Related: Jaded; jading.
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