Etymology
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Drummond light (n.)
"calcium light, torch that burns calcium oxide (lime) and gives off intense white light," 1854, named for Scottish engineer Capt. Thomas Drummond, R.E., (1797-1840), who invented it c. 1825.
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Melchior 
masc. proper name, literally "king of light," from Hebrew melekh "king" + or "light."
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Abner 
masc. proper name, name of Saul's commander in the Old Testament, from Hebrew Abhner, literally "my father is light," from abh "father" + ner "light."
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Luminal (n.)
trade name of phenobarbitone, used as a sedative and hypnotic, coined 1912 in German from Latin lumen "light" (from suffixed form of PIE root *leuk- "light, brightness") + -al (3), "the root here being used, very irregularly, as an equivalent of pheno-" [Flood].
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Corsica 

island in the Mediterranean north of Sardinia, a part of France since 1769, Latin, from Greek Korsis, which is of unknown origin. Renowned in ancient times for the honey and wax of wild bees. Corsican is from 1738 as an adjective; 1748 as a noun "native or inhabitant of Corsica." In early 19c., The Corsican was Napoleon Bonaparte, who was born there.

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Henrietta 
fem. proper name, from French Henriette, fem. diminutive of Henri (see Henry). In late 19c. a type of light dress fabric.
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Sten (n.)
type of light, rapid-fire submachine gun, 1942, from initials of surnames of designers R.V. Shepherd and H.J. Turpin + En(field); compare Bren.
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Lucian 
masc. proper name, from Latin Lucianus (source also of French Lucien), a derivative of Roman Lucius, from lux (genitive lucis) "light" (see light (n.)). The Hellenistic Greek writer (c. 160 C.E., his name is Latinized from Greek Loukianos) was noted as the type of a scoffing wit. Hence Lucianist (1580s) in reference to that sort of writer; it also was "the name of two sorts of heretics" [OED].
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Angstrom (n.)
unit of length equal to one hundred millionth of a centimeter (used to measure wavelengths of light), 1892, named for Swedish physicist Anders Ångström (1814-1874).
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Goshen 
Biblical name of the fertile land settled by the Israelites in Egypt; light shone there during the plague of darkness (Genesis xxxxv.10). The name is of unknown origin.
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