Etymology
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ware (n.)

"manufactured goods, goods for sale," Old English waru "article of merchandise," also "protection, guard," hence probably originally "object of care, that which is kept in custody," from Proto-Germanic *waro (source also of Swedish vara, Danish vare, Old Frisian were, Middle Dutch were, Dutch waar, Middle High German, German ware "goods"), from PIE root *wer- (3) "perceive, watch out for."

Usually wares, except in compounds such as hardware, earthenware, etc. Lady ware was a jocular 17c. euphemism for "a woman's private parts" (but sometimes also "male sex organs"), and Middle English had ape-ware "deceptive or false ware; tricks" (mid-13c.).

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ware (v.)

"to take heed of, beware," Old English warian "to guard against, beware; protect, defend," from Proto-Germanic *warō (source also of Old Frisian waria, Old Norse vara), from PIE *waro- "to guard, watch," suffixed form of root *wer- (3) "perceive, watch out for."

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earthenware (n.)
vessels or other objects of baked or dried clay, 1670s, from earthen + ware (n.). Old English eorðwaran meant "earth-dwellers."
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tableware (n.)
also table-ware, 1799, from table (n.) + ware (n.).
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delftware (n.)
1714, from Delft, town in Holland where the glazed earthenware was made, + ware (n.).
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Tupperware (n.)
1954, trademark (reg. U.S.), from Earl S. Tupper, president of Tupper Corp., + ware (n.). Patent claims use from 1950.
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