Etymology
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want (n.)
c. 1200, "deficiency, insufficiency, shortage," from want (v.) and from Old Norse vant, neuter of vanr "wanting, deficient;" related to Old English wanian "to diminish" (see wane). Meaning "state of destitution, poverty" is recorded from early 14c. Meaning "thing desired, that which is lacking but needed" is from 1560s. Phrase for want of is recorded from c. 1400. Newspaper want ad is recorded from 1897. Middle English had wantsum (c. 1200) "in want, deprived of," literally "want-some."
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want (v.)
c. 1200, "to be lacking," from Old Norse vanta "to lack, want," earlier *wanaton, from Proto-Germanic *wanen, from PIE *weno-, suffixed form of root *eue- "to leave, abandon, give out." The meaning "desire, wish for, feel the need of" is recorded by 1706.
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unwanted (adj.)
1690s, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of want (v.).
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wanted (adj.)
1690s, "lacking;" 1812, "sought by the police;" past-participle adjective from want (v.). Wanted poster attested by 1945.
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wanting (adj.)
early 14c., wantand, "deficient, lacking," present-participle adjective from want (v.). Modern spelling from 16c.
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*eue- 
*euə-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to leave, abandon, give out," with derivatives meaning "abandoned, lacking, empty."

It forms all or part of: avoid; devastation; devoid; evacuate; evanescent; vacant; vacate; vacation; vacuity; vacuole; vacuous; vacuum; vain; vanish; vanity; vaunt; void; wane; want; wanton; waste.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit una- "deficient;" Avestan va- "lack," Persian vang "empty, poor;" Armenian unain "empty;" Latin vacare "to be empty," vastus "empty, waste," vanus "empty, void," figuratively "idle, fruitless;" Old English wanian "to lessen," wan "deficient;" Old Norse vanta "to lack."
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asymmetry (n.)
1650s, "want of symmetry or proportion," from Greek asymmetria "want of proportion or harmony," abstract noun from asymmetros "having no common measure; disproportionate, unsymmetrical," from a- "not" (see a- (3)) + symmetros "commensurable" (see symmetry).
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indigence (n.)
late 14c., from Old French indigence "indigence, need, privation" (13c.), from Latin indigentia "need, want; insatiable desire," from indigentem (nominative indigens) "in want of, needing," present participle of indigere "to need, stand in need of," from indu "in, within" (from PIE *endo-, extended form of root *en "in") + egere "be in need, want," from PIE *eg- "to lack" (source also of Old Norse ekla "want, lack," Old High German eccherode "thin, weak").
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incoherence (n.)
1610s, "want of coherence in thought or language," from in- (1) "not" + coherence; formed on model of Italian incoerenza. From 1670s in literal sense "want of physical coherence."
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invision (n.)
"want of vision," 1640s, from in- (1) "not, opposite of" + vision (n.).
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