Etymology
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wally (n.)
term of admiration, Scottish, early 16c., of unknown origin. As a masc. proper name, a diminutive of Walter, and this might be the source of the teen slang term "unfashionable person" (1969).
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watt (n.)
unit of electrical power, 1882, in honor of James Watt (1736-1819), Scottish engineer and inventor. The surname is from an old pet form of Walter and also is in Watson.
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Mitty 

also Walter Mitty, in reference to an adventurous daydreamer, by 1950, from title character in "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty," short story by U.S. author James Thurber (1894-1961) first published in the New Yorker March 18, 1939.

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NIMBY 

acronym for not in my back yard, 1980, American English, supposedly coined by Walter Rodgers of the American Nuclear Society. Related" Nimbyism.

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Forbes 
U.S. financial publication, founded 1917 by Scottish-born Wall Street journalist B.C. Forbes (1880-1954) and publisher Walter Drey.
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miffed (adj.)

"displeased, slightly offended," by 1824, past-participle adjective from miff (v.). Sir Walter Scott calls it "a women's phrase."

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sporran (n.)

furred leather pouch, 1753, sparren, from Gaelic sporan, Irish sparan "purse," of uncertain origin. Familiarized by Walter Scott.

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Disneyland (n.)

in figurative sense of "land of make-believe" first recorded 1956, from U.S. entertainment park (opened in 1955) created by animator and producer Walter E. Disney (1901-1966).

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witticism (n.)

1670s, coined by Dryden (as wittycism) from witty on model of criticism.

"That every witticism is an inexact thought: that what is perfectly true is imperfectly witty ...." [Walter Savage Landor, "Imaginary Conversations"]
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rhenium (n.)

dense, rare metallic element, 1925, Modern Latin, from Latin Rhenus "the river Rhine" (see Rhine) + element ending -ium. Coined by German chemists Walter Noddack and his wife Ida Tacke; they named it in honor of her native region.

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