Etymology
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voyage (v.)
late 15c., from Old French voyager, from voiage (see voyage (n.)). Related: Voyaged; voyaging.
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voyage (n.)
c. 1300, from Old French voiage "travel, journey, movement, course, errand, mission, crusade" (12c., Modern French voyage), from Late Latin viaticum "a journey" (in classical Latin "provisions for a journey"), noun use of neuter of viaticus "of or for a journey," from via "road, journey, travel" (see via).
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bon voyage 
1670s, French, "pleasant journey," from bon "good," (see bon) + voyage (see voyage (n.)).
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voyager (n.)
late 15c., from Old French voyagier, from voiage (see voyage (n.)).
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foy (n.)
"entertainment given by one about to make a journey," Scottish and dialectal, late 15c., of uncertain origin, perhaps ultimately from French voie "way, journey" (see voyage (n.)).
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*wegh- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to go, move, transport in a vehicle."

The root wegh-, "to convey, especially by wheeled vehicle," is found in virtually every branch of Indo-European, including now Anatolian. The root, as well as other widely represented roots such as aks- and nobh-, attests to the presence of the wheel — and vehicles using it — at the time Proto-Indo-European was spoken. [Watkins, p. 96]

It forms all or part of: always; away; convection; convey; convex; convoy; deviate; devious; envoy; evection; earwig; foy; graywacke; impervious; invective; inveigh; invoice; Norway; obviate; obvious; ochlocracy; ogee; pervious; previous; provection; quadrivium; thalweg; trivia; trivial; trivium; vector; vehemence; vehement; vehicle; vex; via; viaduct; viatic; viaticum; vogue; voyage; wacke; wag; waggish; wagon; wain; wall-eyed; wave (n.); way; wee; weigh; weight; wey; wiggle.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit vahati "carries, conveys," vahitram, vahanam "vessel, ship;" Avestan vazaiti "he leads, draws;" Greek okhos "carriage, chariot;" Latin vehere "to carry, convey," vehiculum "carriage, chariot;" Old Church Slavonic vesti "to carry, convey," vozŭ "carriage, chariot;" Russian povozka "small sled;" Lithuanian vežu, vežti "to carry, convey," važis "a small sled;" Old Irish fecht "campaign, journey," fen "carriage, cart;" Welsh gwain "carriage, cart;" Old English wegan "to carry;" Old Norse vegr, Old High German weg "way;" Middle Dutch wagen "wagon."

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arrival (n.)
late 14c., "act of coming to land at the end of a voyage by sea, disembarkation," from Anglo-French arrivaille, from Old French ariver "to come to land" (see arrive). General meaning "act of coming to the end of any voyage" is from 1510s. Arrivage (late 14c.) also was used in the literal sense.
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cruise (v.)

"sail to and fro or from place to place," 1650s, from Dutch kruisen "to cross, sail to and fro," from kruis "cross," from Latin crux. Compare the sense evolution in cognate cross (v.). Related: Cruised; cruising.

As a noun from 1706, "a voyage taken in courses;" by 1906 as "voyage taken by tourists on a ship."

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landfall (n.)

"sighting of land," 1620s, also "the first land 'made' on a sea voyage" (1883); from land (n.) + fall (v.) in the sense of "happen." A word from the days of imprecise nautical navigation.

Land-fall. The first land discovered after a sea voyage. Thus a good land fall implies the land expected or desired; a bad landfall the reverse. [John Hamilton Moore, "The New Practical Navigator," London, 1814]

Of hurricanes, by 1932.

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osteoporosis (n.)

"morbid absorption of bone, so that it becomes abnormally porous," 1846, from osteo- "bone" + Greek poros "passage; pore; voyage" (see pore (n.)) + -osis. Related: Osteoporotic.

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