Etymology
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vox 

Latin, literally "voice," which is the source of vocare "to call" (from PIE root *wekw- "to speak").

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vox populi (n.)
1540s, Latin, literally "voice of the people." The full maxim (first attested in Medieval Latin) is vox populi, vox Dei "the voice of the people is the voice of God." Short form vox pop attested by 1964.
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*wekw- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to speak."

It forms all or part of: advocate; avocation; calliope; convocation; epic; equivocal; equivocation; evoke; invoke; provoke; revoke; univocal; vocabulary; vocal; vocation; vocative; vociferate; vociferous; voice; vouch; vox; vowel.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit vakti "speaks, says," vacas- "word;" Avestan vac- "speak, say;" Greek eipon (aorist) "spoke, said," epos "word;" Latin vocare "to call," vox "voice, sound, utterance, language, word;" Old Prussian wackis "cry;" German er-wähnen "to mention."
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viva voce 
also viva-voce, "by word of mouth," 1580s, Latin, literally "living-voice," ablative of viva vox.
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univocal (adj.)
1540s, "having one meaning only," from Latin univocus, from uni- (see uni-) + vox "voice, sound, utterance" (from PIE root *wekw- "to speak"). Related: Univocally.
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vociferous (adj.)

1610s, from Latin vociferari "to shout, yell, cry out," from vox (genitive vocis) "voice" (from PIE root *wekw- "to speak") + stem of ferre "to carry" (from PIE root *bher- (1) "to carry"). Related: Vociferously; vociferousness.

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sotto voce 

1737, Italian, literally "under voice," from sotto, from Latin subtus "below" (source also of French sous; see sub-) + voce, from Latin vocem (nominative vox) "voice, sound, utterance" (from PIE root *wekw- "to speak").

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convocate (v.)

"to convoke, call or summon to meet," 1540s, from Latin convocatus, past participle of convocare "to call together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + vocare "to call," a verbal derivative of vox "voice" (from PIE root *wekw- "to speak").

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vociferate (v.)

1590s, a back-formation from vociferation and in part from Latin vociferatus, past participle of vociferari "to cry out, shout, exclaim," from voci-, stem of vox "voice" (from PIE root *wekw- "to speak") + ferre "to carry" (from PIE root *bher- (1) "to carry"). Related: Vociferated; vociferating.

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evocative (adj.)

1650s, "tending to call forth," from Late Latin evocativus "pertaining to summoning," from Latin evocatus, past participle of evocare "call out; rouse, summon," from assimilated form of ex "out" (see ex-) + vocare "to call," which is related to vox (genitive vocis) "voice" (from PIE root *wekw- "to speak").

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