Etymology
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vowel (n.)

c. 1300, from Old French voieul (Modern French voyelle), from Latin vocalis, in littera vocalis, literally "vocal letter," from vox (genitive vocis) "voice," from PIE root *wekw- "to speak." Vowel shift in reference to the pronunciation change between Middle and Modern English is attested from 1909. The English record-holder for most consecutive vowels in a word is queueing.

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intervocalic (adj.)
"between vowels," 1881, from inter- "between" + Latin vocalis "a vowel" (see vowel) + -ic.
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*wekw- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to speak."

It forms all or part of: advocate; avocation; calliope; convocation; epic; equivocal; equivocation; evoke; invoke; provoke; revoke; univocal; vocabulary; vocal; vocation; vocative; vociferate; vociferous; voice; vouch; vox; vowel.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit vakti "speaks, says," vacas- "word;" Avestan vac- "speak, say;" Greek eipon (aorist) "spoke, said," epos "word;" Latin vocare "to call," vox "voice, sound, utterance, language, word;" Old Prussian wackis "cry;" German er-wähnen "to mention."
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schwa (n.)
1895, from German Schwa, ultimately from Hebrew shewa "a neutral vowel quality," literally "emptiness."
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-yer 
agent noun suffix, variant of -ier used after a vowel or -w-.
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shite (n.)

colloquial modern alternative spelling of shit (n.), attested by c. 1740, preserving the original vowel length of the Old English verb.

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punctator (n.)

"one who inserts the vowel points in (Hebrew) writing," 1723, from Latin punctum "a point" (from nasalized form of PIE root *peuk- "to prick"). 

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neurasthenia (n.)
"nervous exhaustion," 1854, medical Latin, from neur- (form of neuro- before a vowel) + asthenia "weakness" (see asthenia). Related: Neurasthenic.
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japonica (n.)
"camellia," 1819, Modern Latin, fem. of japonicus "Japanese, of Japan," from Japon, a variant of Japan with a vowel closer to the Japanese name.
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macron (n.)

"short horizontal line placed over a vowel to indicate length," 1827, from Latinized form of Greek makron, neuter of makros "long" (from PIE root *mak- "long, thin").

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