Etymology
Advertisement
vow (v.)
"promise solemnly," c. 1300, from Old French voer, from voe (see vow (n.)). Related: Vowed; vowing.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
vow (n.)
"solemn promise," c. 1300, from Anglo-French and Old French voe (Modern French vœu), from Latin votum "a promise to a god, solemn pledge, dedication; that which is promised; a wish, desire, longing, prayer," noun use of neuter of votus, past participle of vovere "to promise solemnly, pledge, dedicate, vow," from PIE root *wegwh- "to speak solemnly, vow, preach" (source also of Sanskrit vaghat- "one who offers a sacrifice;" Greek eukhe "vow, wish," eukhomai "I pray"). Meaning "solemn engagement to devote oneself to a religious order or life" is from c. 1400; earlier "to bind oneself" to chastity (early 14c.).
Related entries & more 
votive (adj.)

1590s, "dedicated or given in fulfillment of a vow," from French votif, from Latin votivus "of or pertaining to a vow, promised by a vow, conforming to one's wishes," from votum (see vow (n.)).

Related entries & more 
votary (n.)
1540s, "one consecrated by a vow," from Latin votum "a promise to a god; that which is promised" (see vow (n.)) + -ary. Originally "a monk or nun," general sense of "ardent devotee of some aim or pursuit" is from 1591 (in Shakespeare, originally in reference to love). Related: Votaress.
Related entries & more 
vote (n.)
mid-15c., "formal expression of one's wish or choice with regard to a proposal, candidate, etc.," from Latin votum "a vow, wish, promise to a god, solemn pledge, dedication," noun use of neuter of votus, past participle of vovere "to promise, dedicate" (see vow (n.)). Meaning "totality of voters of a certain class or type" is from 1888.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
devotion (n.)

c. 1200, devocioun, "profound religious emotion, awe, reverence," from Old French devocion "devotion, piety" and directly from Latin devotionem (nominative devotio), noun of action from past-participle stem of devovere "dedicate by a vow, sacrifice oneself, promise solemnly," from de "down, away" (see de-) + vovere "to vow" (see vow (n.)). From late 14c. as "an act of religious worship, a religious exercise" (now usually devotions).

In ancient Latin, "act of consecrating by a vow," also "loyalty, fealty, allegiance;" in Church Latin, "devotion to God, piety." The application to secular situations came to English via Italian and French; sense of "act of setting apart or consecrating" is from c. 1500.

Related entries & more 
devote (v.)

1580s, "appropriate by or as if by vow," from Latin devotus, past participle of devovere "dedicate by a vow, sacrifice oneself, promise solemnly," from de "down, away" (see de-) + vovere "to vow" (see vow (n.)). From c. 1600 as "apply zealously or exclusively." From 1640s as "to doom, consign to some harm or evil," and the word commonly had a negative sense in 18c.: The second and third meanings in Johnson's Dictionary (1755) are "to addict, to give up to ill" and "to curse, to execrate; to doom to destruction." Related: Devoted; devoting.

To devote indicates the inward act, state, or feeling; to dedicate is to set apart by a promise, and indicates primarily an external act; to consecrate is to make sacred, and refers to an act affecting the use or relations of the thing consecrated .... [Century Dictionary]
Related entries & more 
sworn 
past participle of swear; sworn enemies, those who have taken a vow of mutual hatred, is from c. 1600.
Related entries & more 
devout (adj.)

c. 1200, of persons, "yielding reverential devotion to God," especially in prayer, "pious, religious," from Old French devot "pious, devoted, assiduous" (Modern French dévot) and directly from Latin devotus "given up by vow, devoted" (source also of Spanish and Portuguese devoto), past participle of devovere "dedicate by vow" (see devotion). Of actions, "expressing devotion or piety," late 14c. Meaning "sincere, solemn" is from mid-15c. Related: Devoutly; devoutness.

Related entries & more 
vote (v.)
1550s, "give a vote to;" 1560s, "enact or establish by vote,"; see vote (n.). Earlier it meant "to vow" to do something (mid-15c.). Related: Voted; voting.
Related entries & more