Etymology
Advertisement
voracious (adj.)
1630s, formed as an adjectival form of voracity. Related: Voraciously; voraciousness.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
edacious (adj.)

"given to eating, voracious," 1736, from Latin edaci-, stem of edax "voracious, gluttonous," from edere "to eat" (from PIE root *ed- "to eat") + -ous. Related: Edacity (1620s); edaciously; edaciousness.

Related entries & more 
bulimic (adj.)
1854, "voracious;" see bulimia + -ic. Meaning "suffering from bulimia nervosa" is recorded from 1977. The noun in this sense is from 1980.
Related entries & more 
barracuda (n.)

large voracious fish of the West Indies and Florida, 1670s, barracoutha, from American Spanish barracuda, which is perhaps from a Carib word.

Related entries & more 
conger (n.)

"large, voracious species of salt-water eel," c. 1300, from Latin conger "sea-eel," from Greek gongros "conger," which is often considered to be Pre-Greek.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Messalina 

"scheming, licentious, sexually voracious woman," by 1795, in reference to Valeria Messalina (died 48 C.E.), notorious third wife of the Roman emperor Claudius, long a figure of vanity and immorality.

Related entries & more 
piranha (n.)

also pirana, piraya, "voracious carnivorous fish of tropical America," 1869, from Portuguese piranha, from Tupi (Brazil) pira nya, probably literally "biting-fish," with pira "fish."

Related entries & more 
gargantuan (adj.)
"enormous," 1590s, from Gargantua, name of the voracious giant in Rabelais' novels, supposedly from Spanish/Portuguese garganta "gullet, throat," which is from the same imitative root as gargle (v.).
Related entries & more 
pike (n.3)

"type of long, slender, voracious freshwater fish," early 14c., pik (mid-12c. in place names), probably short for pike-fish, a special use of pike (n.2) in reference to the fish's long, pointed jaw, and in part from French brochet "pike" (fish), from broche "a roasting spit." In Middle English, proverbial for health and vigor.

Related entries & more 
ravening (adj.)

"voracious, savage," late 14c., present-participle adjective from an extinct verb ravine, raven "to prey, to plunder, devour greedily" (mid-14c.), from Old French raviner, ravinier "to seize, pillage" (see raven (v.)). It is etymologically related to ravenous, but not to raven (n.). Related: Raveningly.

Related entries & more