Etymology
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vomit (v.)
early 15c., from Latin vomitus, past participle of vomitare (see vomit (n.)). Related: Vomited; vomiting.
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vomit (n.)

late 14c., "act of expelling contents of the stomach through the mouth," from Anglo-French vomit, Old French vomite, from Latin vomitus, from vomitare "to vomit often," frequentative of vomere "to puke, spew forth, discharge," from PIE root *weme- "to spit, vomit" (source also of Greek emein "to vomit," emetikos "provoking sickness;" Sanskrit vamati "he vomits;" Avestan vam- "to spit;" Lithuanian vemti "to vomit," Old Norse væma "seasickness"). In reference to the matter so ejected, it is attested from late 14c.

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ignivomous (adj.)
"vomiting fire," c. 1600, from Late Latin ignivomous, from Latin ignis "fire" (see igneous) + vomere "to vomit" (see vomit (n.)).
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vomitorium (n.)
1754, "passage or opening in an ancient amphitheater, leading to or from the seats," from Latin (Macrobius, Sat., VI.iv), from vomitare (see vomit (n.)) + -orium (see -ory). Meaning "place where ancient Romans (allegedly) deliberately vomited during feasts" is attested by 1869.
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emetic 

1650s (n.) "medicine that induces vomiting;" 1660s (adj.) "inducing vomiting;" from French émétique (16c.), from Latin emeticus, from Greek emetikos "causing vomiting," from emesis "vomiting," from emein "to vomit," from PIE *weme- "to spit, vomit" (see vomit (v.)).

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upchuck (v.)

"to vomit," 1936, American English slang, from up (adv.) + chuck (v.) "to throw."

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chunder (v.)
"vomit," 1950, Australian slang, of unknown origin.
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cascade (v.)
"to fall in cascades," 1702, from cascade (n.). In early 19c. slang, "to vomit." Related: Cascaded; cascading.
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emesis (n.)
"action of vomiting," 1875, medical Latin, from Greek emesis "a vomiting," from emein "to vomit" (see emetic).
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barf (v.)
"to vomit or retch,"1960, American English slang, probably imitative. Related: Barfed; barfing. Barf bag "air sickness pouch" attested from 1966.
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