Etymology
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micro- 

word-forming element meaning "small in size or extent, microscopic; magnifying;" in science indicating a unit one millionth of the unit it is prefixed to; from Latinized form of mikros, Attic form of Greek smikros "small, little, petty, trivial, slight," perhaps from PIE *smika, from root *smik- "small" (source also of Old High German smahi "littleness"), but Beekes thinks it a Pre-Greek word.

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deci- 

in the metric system, word-forming element denoting one-tenth of the standard unit of measure, 1801, from French deci-, taken arbitrarily from Latin decimus "tenth," from decem "ten" (from PIE root *dekm- "ten").

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mega- 

before vowels meg-, word-forming element often meaning "large, great," but in physics a precise measurement to denote the unit taken a million times (megaton, megawatt, etc.), from Greek megas "great, large, vast, big, high, tall; mighty, important" (fem. megale), from PIE root *meg- "great." Mega began to be used alone as an adjective by 1982.

High-speed computer stores 2.5 megabits [headline in "Electronics" magazine, Oct. 1, 1957]
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sesqui- 

word-forming element meaning usually "one half more" than the indicated unit, from Latin sesqui-, sesque- "one and a half; one-half more," contraction of *semis-que- "a half in addition," from *semis "a half" (see semi-) + -que "and" (from PIE root *kwe "and, -ever," for which see ubiquity). Latin semi- had a tendency to get partly swallowed in compounds; compare these derivatives listed in de Vaan: selibra "half a libra," semodius "half a modius," sestertius "having the value of two-and-a-half" (as a noun, the name of a silver Roman coin, short for sestertius nummus), contracted from *semistertius; simbella "coin worth half a libella;" sincipitis "a half-head."

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