Etymology
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volt (n.)
unit of electromotive force, 1873, back-formation from voltaic.
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voltmeter (n.)
instrument for measuring the difference of potentials in volts, 1882, from volt + meter (n.3).
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voltage (n.)
"electromotive force reckoned in volts," 1882, from volt + -age.
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megavolt (n.)

unit of measure equivalent to one million volts, 1868, from mega- "one million" + volt.

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ampere (n.)
1881, "the current that one volt can send through a resistance of one ohm," from French ampère, named for French physicist André-Marie Ampère (1775-1836). Adopted by the Electric Congress at Paris in 1881. Shortened form amp is attested from 1886.
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Volta 
West African river, from 15c. Portuguese Rio da Volta, literally "river of return" (perhaps because it was where ships turned around and headed for home) or "river of bend," in reference to its course.
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Voltaire 

name taken from 1718 by French author François Marie Arouet after his imprisonment in the Bastille on suspicion of having written some satirical verses; originally de Voltaire. The signification is uncertain.

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voltaic (adj.)
1813, designating electricity produced by chemical action, formed in recognition of Italian physicist Alessandro Volta (1745-1827), who perfected a chemical process used in electrical batteries, + -ic.
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volte-face 
a reversal of opinion, 1819, French (17c.), from Italian volta faccia, literally "turn face," from volta, imperative of voltare "to turn" (from Vulgar Latin *volvita, from Latin volvere "to roll," from PIE root *wel- (3) "to turn, revolve") + faccia (see face).
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