Etymology
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volcano (n.)
1610s, from Italian vulcano "burning mountain," from Latin Vulcanus "Vulcan," Roman god of fire, also "fire, flames, volcano" (see Vulcan). The name was first applied to Mt. Etna by the Romans, who believed it was the forge of Vulcan. Earlier form in English was volcan (1570s), from French.
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volcanism (n.)
1819, from French volcanisme, from volcan (see volcano).
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stratovolcano (n.)
coined in German (von Seebach, 1866), from strato- + volcano. So called for its layered structure.
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volcanic (adj.)
1774, from French volcanique, from Italian vulcanico, from vulcano (see volcano). Figurative sense of "prone to explosive activity" is attested from 1854.
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Vesuvius 
volcano near Naples, of unknown origin; perhaps from Celtic root *ves- "mountain" or Oscan fesf "smoke, steam." Related: Vesuvian.
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Kilimanjaro 

dormant volcano in Tanzania, it is the highest mountain in Africa. The name is of unknown origin; the first element appears to be Swahili kilima "(little) mountain," but even this is uncertain.  See J.A. Hutchinson, "The Meaning of Kilimanjaro," in Tanganyika Notes and Records, 1965.

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Etna 
volcano in Sicily, from Latin Aetna, from an indigenous Sicilian language, *aith-na "the fiery one," from PIE *ai-dh-, from root *ai- (2) "to burn" (see edifice). Related: Etnean.
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eject (v.)
mid-15c., from Latin eiectus "thrown out," past participle of eicere "throw out, cast out, thrust out; drive into exile, expel, drive away," from ex "out" (see ex-) + -icere, combining form of iacere "to throw" (from PIE root *ye- "to throw, impel"). Related: Ejected; ejecting. Ejecta "matter thrown out by a volcano" is from 1851.
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caldera (n.)

"cavity on the summit of a volcano," 1865, from Spanish caldera, literally "cauldron, kettle," from Latin caldarium "hot-bath" (plural caldaria), from caldarius "pertaining to warming," from calidus "warm, hot" (from PIE root *kele- (1) "warm"). A doublet of cauldron.

The term was originally used in describing volcanic regions occurring where Spanish is the current language, and was introduced by Von Buch in his description of the Canaries. [Century Dictionary]
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blow up (v.)
1590s, "explode;" 1690s "cause to explode;" from blow (v.1) + up (adv.). From 1670s as "inflate, puff up." Figurative sense "lose one's temper" is from 1871.

As a noun, it is recorded from 1809 in the sense "outburst, quarrel;" 1807 as "an explosion." Meaning "enlargement from a photograph" is attested by 1945 (the verbal phrase in this sense is by 1930). Old English had an adjective upablawan "upblown," used of a volcano, etc.
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