Etymology
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vocabulary (n.)

1530s, "list of words with explanations," from Medieval Latin vocabularium "a list of words," from Latin vocabulum "word, name, noun," from vocare "to name, call," which is related to vox (genitive vocis) "voice" (from PIE root *wekw- "to speak"). The meaning "range of words in the language of a person or group" is attested from 1753.

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*wekw- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to speak."

It forms all or part of: advocate; avocation; calliope; convocation; epic; equivocal; equivocation; evoke; invoke; provoke; revoke; univocal; vocabulary; vocal; vocation; vocative; vociferate; vociferous; voice; vouch; vox; vowel.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit vakti "speaks, says," vacas- "word;" Avestan vac- "speak, say;" Greek eipon (aorist) "spoke, said," epos "word;" Latin vocare "to call," vox "voice, sound, utterance, language, word;" Old Prussian wackis "cry;" German er-wähnen "to mention."
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lexical (adj.)
"relating to the vocabulary of a language," 1833, from a Latinized form of Greek lexikos "pertaining to words" (see lexicon) + -al (1). Related: Lexically.
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galvanization (n.)
1798, formed as a noun of state to go with the vocabulary of galvanism; perhaps immediately from French galvanisation (1797 in the "Annales de chimie et de physique").
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reminisce (v.)

1829, "to recollect," a back-formation from reminiscence. Meaning "indulge in reminiscences" is from 1871. "[S]omewhat colloquial" [OED] and mistrusted by the literary (in the OED's earliest citation for it, reminisce is followed immediately by an aside, "the word shall never enter my vocabulary"). Related: Reminisced. Reminiscing as a verbal noun, "action of remembering," is by 1891.

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helmet (n.)

mid-15c., perhaps a diminutive of Middle English helm (see helm (n.2)). But some sources suggest Old French heaumet (Modern French heaume), a French diminutive of helme "helmet," from the same Germanic source as helm (n.2); Barnhart writes: "Old English helm never became an active term in the standard vocabulary of English."

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analogous (adj.)

"corresponding (to some other) in particulars," 1640s, from Latin analogus, from Greek analogos "proportionate, according to due proportion," from ana "throughout; according to" (see ana-) + logos "ratio, proportion," a specialized use (see Logos). Used with to or with.

A term is analogous whose single signification applies with equal propriety to more than one object: as, the leg of the table, the leg of the animal. [William Flemming, "The Vocabulary of Philosophy," 1858]
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psychopomp (n.)

"guide or conductor of spirits or souls to the other world," 1835, from Greek psykhopompos "spirit-guide," a term applied to Charon, Hermes Trismegistos, Apollo, etc.; from psykhē "the soul, mind, spirit" (see psyche) + pompos "guide, conductor, escort, messenger," from pempein "to send, dispatch, guide, accompany," which is of unknown origin. "The verb has no IE etymology, nor does it show characteristics of loanwords or Pre-Greek vocabulary" [Beekes].

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inkhorn (n.)
late 14c., "small portable vessel (originally made of horn) for holding ink," from ink (n.) + horn (n.). Used attributively from 1540s ("Soche are your Ynkehorne termes," John Bale) as an adjective for things (especially vocabulary) supposed to be beloved by scribblers, pedants, and bookworms. An Old English word for the thing was blæchorn.
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gurgle (v.)
early 15c., medical term for "gurgling heard in the abdomen," a native, echoic formation, or ultimately from Latin gurguliare, perhaps via Dutch, German gurgeln. Extended (non-anatomical) use, in reference to water over stones, etc., is first recorded 1713. "This phenomenon of long specialized use before becoming a part of the general vocabulary is often found in English" [Barnhart]. Related: Gurgled; gurgling.
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