Etymology
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vivid (adj.)

1630s, from French vivide and perhaps also directly from Latin vividus "spirited, animated, lively, full of life," from vivus "alive" (from PIE root *gwei- "to live"). Extension to colors is from 1660s. Sense of "strong, distinct" (as of memories, etc.) is from 1680s; that of "very active or intense" (as of imagination, interest, etc.) is from 1853. Related: Vividly; vividness.

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Vivian 
masc. proper name, from Latin Vivianus (source also of French Vivien), literally "living, alive," (see vivid). But Klein says it is "prob. a misreading of the Celtic name Ninian."
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*gwei- 
also *gweie-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to live."

It forms all or part of: abiogenesis; aerobic; amphibian; anaerobic; azo-; azoic; azotemia; bio-; biography; biology; biome; bionics; biopsy; biota; biotic; cenobite; Cenozoic; convivial; couch-grass; epizoic; epizoon; epizootic; macrobiotic; Mesozoic; microbe; Protozoa; protozoic; quick; quicken; quicksand; quicksilver; quiver (v.) "to tremble;" revive; survive; symbiosis; viable; viand; viper; vita; vital; vitamin; victuals; viva; vivace; vivacious; vivarium; vivid; vivify; viviparous; vivisection; whiskey; wyvern; zodiac; Zoe; zoetrope; zoic; zoo-; zoolatry; zoology; zoon; zoophilia; zoophobia; zooplankton.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit jivah "alive, living;" Old Persian *jivaka- "alive," Middle Persian zhiwak "alive;" Greek bios "one's life, course or way of living, lifetime," zoe "animal life, organic life;" Old English cwic, cwicu "living, alive;" Latin vivus "living, alive," vita "life;" Old Church Slavonic zivo "to live;" Lithuanian gyvas "living, alive," gyvata "(eternal) life;" Old Irish bethu "life," bith "age;" Welsh byd "world."
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resplendence (n.)

"vivid brightness, brilliance, splendor," early 15c., from Late Latin resplendentia, abstract noun from present-participle stem of Latin resplendens "brilliant, radiant" (see resplendent). Related: Respendency.

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glaring (adj.)
late 14c., "staring fiercely," present-participle adjective from glare (v.). From 1510s of colors, etc., "vivid, dazzling;" meaning "obtrusively conspicuous" is from 1706. Related: Glaringly.
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technicolor (n.)
"vivid color," 1946, earlier as a trademark name (Technicolor, registered in U.S. 1917) for a process of making color movies, from technical + color (n.). As an adjective from 1940.
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striking (adj.)
1610s, "that strikes," present-participle adjective from strike (v.). Meaning "producing a vivid impression" id from 1752, from the verb in the sense of "to catch the fancy of" (1590s). Related: Strikingly.
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coruscate (v.)

"emit, vivid flashes of light," 1705, from Latin coruscatus, past participle of coruscare "to vibrate, glitter," perhaps from PIE *(s)ker- (2) "leap, jump about" (compare scherzo), but de Vaan considers this "a long shot." Related: Coruscated; coruscating.

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quickly (adv.)

mid-15c., quickli, "lively, vivid, lifelike," from quick (adj.) + -ly (2), and compare late Old English cwiculice "vigorously, keenly." Meaning "rapidly, in a short space of time" is from c. 1200.

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picturesque (adj.)

"picture-like, possessing notably original and pleasing qualities," 1703, on pattern of French pittoresque, a loan-word from Italian pittoresco, literally "pictorial" (1660s), from pittore "painter," from Latin pictorem (nominative pictor); see painter (n.1). Of language (somewhat euphemistically), "graphic, vivid," by 1734. As a noun, "that which is picturesque," from 1749. Related: Picturesquely; picturesqueness.

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