Etymology
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viscous (adj.)
late 14c., from Anglo-French viscous and directly from Late Latin viscosus "sticky," from Latin viscum "anything sticky, birdlime made from mistletoe, mistletoe," probably from PIE root *weis- "to melt away, flow" (used of foul or malodorous fluids); see virus.
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viscosity (n.)
early 15c., from Old French viscosite (13c.) or directly from Medieval Latin viscositatem (nominative viscositas), from Late Latin viscosus (see viscous).
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viscid (adj.)
"sticky," 1630s, from French viscide or directly from Late Latin viscidus "sticky, clammy," from Latin viscum "mistletoe, birdlime" (see viscous). Related: Viscidity (1610s); viscidly.
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glutinous (adj.)
"viscous, sticky, of the nature of glue," early 15c., from Latin glutinosus "gluey, viscous, tenacious," from gluten (genitive glutinis) "glue" (see glue (n.)). Glutinosity is from c. 1400. Related: Glutinousness.
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glop (n.)
"inferior food," 1943, imitative of the sound of something unappetizingly viscous hitting a dinner plate.
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mucilaginous (adj.)

early 15c., "viscous, sticky; slimy and ropy," from Medieval Latin muscilaginosus, from Late Latin mucilaginosus, from mucilago (see mucilage). Related: Mucilaginously; mucilaginousness.

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gunk (n.)
"viscous substance," 1949, American English, apparently from Gunk, trademark for a thick liquid soap patented 1932 by A.F. Curran Co. of Malden, Mass.
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ropy (adj.)

"forming or developing slimy, viscous threads; sticky and stringy," late 15c. (Caxton), from rope (n.) + -y (2). Hence a general term of disapprobation. Related: Ropily; ropiness.

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bird-lime (n.)
viscous sticky stuff prepared from holly bark and used to catch small birds, mid-15c., from bird (n.1) + lime (n.1). Used as rhyming slang for time (especially time in prison) by 1857; hence bird (n.) "jail" (by 1924).
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mucilage (n.)

late 14c., mussillage, "viscous substance found in vegetable material," from Old French mucilage (14c.) and directly from Late Latin mucilago "musty or moldy juice" (4c.), from Latin mucere "be musty or moldy," from mucus "mucus" (see mucus). Meaning "adhesive gum" is attested by 1859.

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