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81 entries found.
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violence (n.)
late 13c., "physical force used to inflict injury or damage," from Anglo-French and Old French violence (13c.), from Latin violentia "vehemence, impetuosity," from violentus "vehement, forcible," probably related to violare (see violation). Weakened sense of "improper treatment" is attested from 1590s.
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non-violence (n.)
also nonviolence, 1831, from non- + violence. Gandhi used it from 1920.
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non-violent (adj.)

also nonviolent, "using peaceful means," especially to bring about change in a society,  1896, from non- + violent (adj.). From 1920 in reference to "principle or practice of abstaining from violence," in writings of M.K. Gandhi.

It is better to be violent, if there is violence in our hearts, than to put on the cloak of non-violence to cover impotence. [Gandhi, "Non-violence in Peace and War," 1948]
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render (n.1)

"one who tears by violence," 1580s, agent noun from rend (v.).

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hatha-yoga (n.)
1911, from Sanskrit hatha "force, violence, forced meditation" + yoga (see yoga).
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whammo 
exclamation signifying violence or surprise, 1932, from wham (q.v.).
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ahimsa (n.)
doctrine of non-violence, 1875, from Sanskrit ahimsa, from a "without" (from PIE root *ne- "not") + himsa "injury."
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amain (adv.)
"with violence, strength, or force," 1530s, from main (adj.) by analogy with other words in a- (such as afoot).
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outrage (v.)

c. 1300, outragen, "to go to excess, act immoderately," from outrage (n.) or from Old French oultrager. From 1580s with meaning "do violence to, attack, maltreat." Related: Outraged; outraging.

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gentleness (n.)
c. 1300, "inherited nature," from gentle + -ness. Meaning "freedom from harshness or violence" is from 1610s.
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