Etymology
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video (adj.)

1935, as visual equivalent of audio, from Latin video "I see," first person singular present indicative of videre "to see" (see vision). As a noun, "that which is displayed on a (television) screen," 1937.

Engineers, however, remember the sad fate of television's first debut and are not willing to allow "video transmission" (as television is now called by moderns) to leave the laboratory until they are sure it will be accepted. [The Michigan Technic, November 1937]

video game is from 1973.

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videotape (n.)
1953, from video + tape (n.). The verb is 1958, from the noun. Related: Videotaped; videotaping.
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veejay (n.)
1982, from pronunciation of V.J., from video, on model of deejay (see disk).
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videocassette (n.)
1970, from video + cassette. Videocassette recorder is from 1971, usually VCR (also 1971), now a period piece.
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VHS 
1982, initialism (acronym) of Video Home System.
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camcorder (n.)
"portable video camera recorder," 1982, from camera and recorder.
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gaming (n.)
c. 1500, "gambling," verbal noun from game (v.). From 1980s in reference to video and computer games. Gaming-house is from 1620s; gaming-table from 1590s.
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cosplay (n.)

"practice or hobby of dressing as a character from a movie, book, or video game, especially one from Japanese manga and anime," 1993, according to Merriam-Webster, from costume (n.) + play (n.), based on a Japanese word formed from the same English elements and alleged to date from 1983. Also used as a verb.

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Pokemon (n.)
video and trading card franchise, released in Japan in 1996, said to be from a contracted Romanization of Japanese Poketto Monsuta "pocket monsters," both elements ultimately from European languages. Apparently it is a collective word with no distinctive plural form.
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