Etymology
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vide 
"see," Latin imperative singular of videre "to see" (from PIE root *weid- "to see").
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v.i. 
abbreviation of Latin vide infra "see below."
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vid. 
abbreviation of vide, Latin imperative singular of videre "to see" (see vision).
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q.v. 

abbreviation of the Latin phrase quod vide "which see," placed after a dictionary entry, book title, etc., to refer the reader to it for further information. From neuter of qui "who" + imperative singular of videre "to see."

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withy (n.)

Old English wiðig "willow, willow twig," from Proto-Germanic *with- "willow" (source also of Old Norse viðir, Danish vidje, Swedish vide, Old High German wida, German Weide "willow"), from PIE root *wei-  "to bend, twist" (source also of Avestan vaeiti- "osier," Greek itea "willow," Latin vītis "vine," Lithuanian vytis "willow twig," Polish witwa, Welsh gwden "willow," Russian vitvina "branch, bough").

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videotape (n.)
1953, from video + tape (n.). The verb is 1958, from the noun. Related: Videotaped; videotaping.
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videlicet 
"namely, to wit," mid-15c., see viz.
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video (adj.)

1935, as visual equivalent of audio, from Latin video "I see," first person singular present indicative of videre "to see" (see vision). As a noun, "that which is displayed on a (television) screen," 1937.

Engineers, however, remember the sad fate of television's first debut and are not willing to allow "video transmission" (as television is now called by moderns) to leave the laboratory until they are sure it will be accepted. [The Michigan Technic, November 1937]

video game is from 1973.

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