Etymology
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victuals (n.)
c. 1300, vitaylle (singular), from Anglo-French and Old French vitaille "food, nourishment, provisions," from Late Latin victualia "provisions," noun use of plural of victualis "of nourishment," from victus "livelihood, food, sustenance, that which sustains life," from past participle stem of vivere "to live" (from PIE root *gwei- "to live"). Spelling altered early 16c. to conform with Latin, but pronunciation remains "vittles."
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victual (v.)
mid-14c., "to stock or supply (a ship, garrison, etc.) with provisions to last for some time," from Anglo-French or Old French vitaillier (12c.), from vitaille (see victuals). Related: Victualed; victualing; Victualer; victualler.
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viand (n.)

"article of food," early 14c., from Anglo-French viaunde, Old French viande "food (vegetable as well as animal), victuals, provisions" (11c.), a dissimilation of Vulgar Latin *vivanda, from Late Latin vivenda "things for living, things to be lived upon," in classical Latin, "be live," neuter plural gerundive of vivere "to live" (from PIE root *gwei- "to live"). The French word later was restricted to fresh meat.

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sheriff (n.)
late Old English scirgerefa "representative of royal authority in a shire," from scir (see shire) + gerefa "chief, official, reeve" (see reeve). As an American county official, attested from 1660s; sheriff's sale first recorded 1798. Sheriff's tooth (late 14c.) was a common name for the annual tax levied to pay for the sheriff's victuals during court sessions.
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scrannel (adj.)

"thin, slight, slender, eager," 1630s; any modern use traces to Milton ("Lycidas," 124), who may have invented it out of dialectal scranny, a variant of scrawny. Or it might have been an existing word from a Scandinavian source akin to Norwegian skran "rubbish." Also compare English dialectal and Scottish skran "scraps, broken victuals; refuse," in military slang "food," which is of obscure origin, hence out on the scran "begging."

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found (adj.)
"discovered," late 14c., past-participle adjective from find (v.). Expression and found attached to the wages or charges in old advertisements for job openings, traveling berths, etc., indicates that meals are provided. It comes from the expression to find one's self "to provide for one's self." "When a laborer engages to provide himself with victuals, he is said to find himself, or to receive day wages" [Bartlett, "Dictionary of Americanisms," 1848]. Hence, so much and found for "wages + meals provided."
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