Etymology
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vesicle (n.)

"small, bladder-like structure," early 15c., from French vesicule, from Latin vesicula "little blister," diminutive of vesica "bladder, blister" (see ventral).

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cyst (n.)

"bladder-like bag or vesicle in an animal body," 1713, from Modern Latin cystis (in English as a Latin word from 1540s), from Greek kystis "bladder, pouch," which is of uncertain etymology.

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vacuole (n.)
"small cavity or vesicle," 1853, from French vacuole, from Medieval Latin vacuola, formed as a diminutive of Latin vacuus "empty," from PIE *wak-, extended form of root *eue- "to leave, abandon, give out."
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blister (n.)
c. 1300, "thin vesicle on the skin containing watery matter," perhaps via Old French blestre "blister, lump, bump," from a Scandinavian source (compare Old Norse blastr "a blowing," dative blæstri "swelling"), or from Middle Dutch blyster "swelling;" all perhaps from PIE *bhlei- "to blow, swell," extension of root *bhel- (2) "to blow, swell."
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bubble (n.)

"small vesicle of water or some other fluid inflated with air or gas," early 14c., perhaps from Middle Dutch bobbel (n.) and/or Middle Low German bubbeln (v.), all probably of echoic origin. Figurative use in reference to anything wanting firmness, substance, or permanence is from 1590s. Specifically in reference to inflated markets or financial schemes originally in South Sea Bubble, which originated c. 1711 and collapsed 1720. Bubble-bath recorded by 1937. Bubble-shell is from 1847.

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