Etymology
Advertisement
versed (adj.)

"practiced, conversant, acquainted," c. 1600, from past participle of obsolete verse "to turn over" (a book, subject, etc.) in study or investigation, from French verser "to turn, revolve" as in meditation (12c.), from Latin versare "be employed, busy oneself," literally "to turn to, turn often; think over," frequentative of vertere "to turn" (from PIE root *wer- (2) "to turn, bend").

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
technologist (n.)
"one versed in technology," 1803, from technology + -ist.
Related entries & more 
techie (n.)
one well-versed in the latest technology, by 1984.
Related entries & more 
dermatologist (n.)

"one versed in the skin and its diseases," 1833; see dermatology + -ist.

Related entries & more 
educationist (n.)
"one versed in the theory and practice of education," 1815; see education + -ist.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
neurologist (n.)

"one who studies or is versed in neurology," 1801, from neurology + -ist.

Related entries & more 
microbiologist (n.)

"one who studies or is versed in the knowledge of microbes," 1882, from microbiology + -ist.

Related entries & more 
entomologist (n.)

"one versed in or engaged in the study of insects," 1771; see entomology + -ist.

Related entries & more 
ophthalmologist (n.)

"one versed in ophthalmology," 1825; see ophthalmology + -ist.

Related entries & more 
paleontologist (n.)

also palaeontologist, "one versed in the study of the former life of the Earth as preserved in fossils," 1836, from paleontology + -ist.

Related entries & more