Etymology
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verify (v.)
early 14c., from Old French verifier "substantiate, find out the truth about" (14c.), from Medieval Latin verificare "make true," from Latin verus "true" (from PIE root *were-o- "true, trustworthy") + combining form of facere "to make" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put").
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verifiable (adj.)
1590s, from verify + -able. Related: Verifiably; verifiability.
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verification (n.)
1520s, from Medieval Latin *verificationem (nominative verificatio), noun of action from past participle stem of verificare (see verify). Middle English had verifiaunce "confirmation, corroboration" (c. 1400).
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authenticate (v.)
"verify, establish the credibility of," 1650s, from Medieval Latin authenticatus, past participle of authenticare, from Late Latin authenticus (see authentic). Also "render authentic" (1650s). Related: Authenticated; authenticating.
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audit (v.)
mid-15c., "examine and verify (accounts)," from audit (n.). Meaning "attend (a course, etc.) without intending to earn credit by doing course-work" is from 1933. Related: Audited; auditing.
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aver (v.)
late 14c., "assert the truth of," from Old French averer "verify, confirm, prove" (12c.), from Vulgar Latin *adverare "make true, prove to be true," from Latin ad "to" (see ad-) + verus "true" (from PIE root *were-o- "true, trustworthy"). From 1580s as "affirm with confidence." Related: Averred; averring.
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collate (v.)
Origin and meaning of collate

1610s, "to bring together and compare, examine critically as to agreement," from Latin collatus, irregular past participle of conferre "to bring together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see com-) + lātus "borne, carried" (see oblate (n.)), serving as past participle of ferre "to bear" (from PIE root *bher- (1) "to carry"). Specifically, in bookbinding, "to verify the correct arrangement" (of the pages), 1770. Related: Collated; collating.

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confirm (v.)

mid-13c., confirmyn, confermen "to ratify, sanction, make valid by a legal act," from Old French confermer (13c., Modern French confirmer) "strengthen, establish, consolidate; affirm by proof or evidence; anoint (a king)," from Latin confirmare "make firm, strengthen, establish," from assimilated form of com"together," but here perhaps an intensive prefix (see con-), + firmare "to strengthen," from firmus "strong, steadfast" (from suffixed form of PIE root *dher- "to hold firmly, support").

From mid-14c. as "make firm or more firm, add strength to;" late 14c. as "make certain or sure, give an assurance of truth, verify." Related: Confirmative; confirmatory.

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control (v.)

early 15c., countrollen, "to check the accuracy of, verify; to regulate," from Anglo-French contreroller "exert authority," from Medieval Latin contrarotulus "a counter, register," from Latin contra "against" (see contra) + rotulus, diminutive of rota "wheel" (see roll (n.)). The word apparently comes from a medieval method of checking accounts by a duplicate register.

Un contrerollour qui doit contre roller au tresorere de la garderobe toutz lez receitez. [Household ordinances of Edward II, c. 1310]

Sense of "dominate, direct, exercise control over" is from mid-15c. Related: Controlled; controlling. Control group in scientific experiments is attested from 1952 (from a sense of control attested since 1875).

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