Etymology
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verbose (adj.)
"wordy," 1670s, from Latin verbosus "full of words, wordy," from verbum "word" (see verb). Related: Verbosely (c. 1400); verboseness.
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verbosity (n.)
1540s, from French verbosité (16c.) or directly from Late Latin verbositas, from Latin verbosus (see verbose).
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wordy (adj.)
Old English wordig "verbose;" see word (n.) + -y (2).
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diffuse (adj.)
Origin and meaning of diffuse

early 15c., "hard to understand;" also, of writers, "verbose, using many words;" from Latin diffusus, past participle of diffundere "scatter, pour out," from dis- "apart, in every direction" (see dis-) + fundere "to pour" (from nasalized form of PIE root *gheu- "to pour"). Meaning "widely spread or diffused, scattered" is from late 15c.

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