Etymology
Advertisement
verbal (adj.)
early 15c., "dealing with words" (especially in contrast to things or realities), from Old French verbal (14c.) and directly from Late Latin verbalis "consisting of words, relating to verbs," from Latin verbum "word" (see verb). Related: Verbally. Verbal conditioning is recorded from 1954. Colloquial verbal diarrhea is recorded from 1823. A verbal noun is a noun derived from a verb and sharing in its senses and constructions.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
non-verbal (adj.)

also nonverbal, "not using words," by 1809, from non- + verbal. Related: Non-verbally.

Related entries & more 
verbalize (v.)
c. 1600, "use too many words," from French verbaliser (16c.); see verbal. Meaning "express in words" is attested from 1875. Related: Verbalized; verbalizing.
Related entries & more 
preverbal (adj.)

also pre-verbal, "prior to or present before the development of speech," 1931, from pre- "before" + verbal.

Related entries & more 
bickering (n.)
c. 1300, "a skirmish," verbal noun from bicker (v.). Meaning "a verbal wrangle" is from 1570s.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
bussing (n.)
"kissing," 1570s, verbal noun from buss (v.).
Related entries & more 
wadding (n.)
"stuffing," 1620s, verbal noun from wad (v.).
Related entries & more 
yelling (n.)
mid-13c., verbal noun from yell (v.).
Related entries & more 
gardening (n.)
1570s, verbal noun from garden (v.).
Related entries & more 
stitching (n.)
1520s, verbal noun from stitch (v.).
Related entries & more