Etymology
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verb (n.)

"a word that asserts or declares; that part of speech of which the office is predication, and which, either alone or with various modifiers or adjuncts, combines with a subject to make a sentence" [Century Dictionary], late 14c., from Old French verbe "word; word of God; saying; part of speech that expresses action or being" (12c.) and directly from Latin verbum "verb," originally "a word," from PIE root *were- (3) "to speak" (source also of Avestan urvata- "command;" Sanskrit vrata- "command, vow;" Greek rhētōr "public speaker," rhetra "agreement, covenant," eirein "to speak, say;" Hittite weriga- "call, summon;" Lithuanian vardas "name;" Gothic waurd, Old English word "word").

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verbatim (adv.)
late 15c., from Medieval Latin verbatim "word for word," from Latin verbum "word" (see verb). As an adjective from 1737.
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verbicide (n.)
"the killing of a word" by perversion from its original meaning, 1836, from Latin verbum "word" (see verb) + -cide "a killing."
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verbose (adj.)
"wordy," 1670s, from Latin verbosus "full of words, wordy," from verbum "word" (see verb). Related: Verbosely (c. 1400); verboseness.
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verbiculture (n.)
"the production of words," 1873, from Latin verbum "word" (see verb) + ending from agriculture, etc. Coined by Fitzedward Hall, in "Modern English." He was scolded for it in the "Edinburgh Review."
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in totidem verbis 
Latin phrase, "in just so many words," that is, "in these very words," from demonstrative of Latin totus "whole, entire" (see total (adj.)) + ablative plural of verbum "word" (see verb).
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verbiage (n.)

"abundance of words," 1721, from French verbiage "wordiness" (17c.), from verbier "to chatter," from Old French verbe "word," from Latin verbum "word" (see verb).

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verbigeration (n.)
"the continual utterance of certain words or phrases, repeated at short intervals, without any reference to their meanings" [Century Dictionary], 1877, earlier in German, noun of action from Late Latin verbigere "to talk, chat, dispute," from Latin verbum (see verb).
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cruciverbalist (n.)

"maker of crossword puzzles," by 1977, mock-Latin, coined in English from Latin cruci-, combining form of crux "cross" (see crux) + verbum "word" (see verb).

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verbarian (n.)
"word-coiner," 1873, from Latin verbum "word" (see verb) + -arian. Coleridge (or the friend he was quoting) had used it earlier as an adjective, and with a different sense, in wishing for: "a verbarian Attorney-General, authorised to bring informations ex officio against the writer or editor of any work in extensive circulation, who, after due notice issued, should persevere in misusing a word" (1830).
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