Etymology
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veneration (n.)
early 15c., from Old French veneracion, from Latin venerationem (nominative veneratio) "reverence, profoundest respect," noun of action from past participle stem of venerari "to worship, revere," from venus (genitive veneris) "beauty, love, desire" (from PIE root *wen- (1) "to desire, strive for").
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venerate (v.)
1620s, back-formation from veneration, or else from Latin veneratus, past participle of venerari "to reverence, worship," from venus (genitive veneris) "beauty, love, desire" (from PIE root *wen- (1) "to desire, strive for"). Related: Venerated; venerating.
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*wen- (1)
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to desire, strive for."

It forms all or part of: vanadium; Vanir; venerate; veneration; venerable; venereal; venery (n.1) "pursuit of sexual pleasure;" venery (n.2) "hunting, the sports of the chase;" venial; venison; venom; Venus; wean; ween; Wend "Slavic people of eastern Germany;" win; winsome; wish; wont; wynn.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit veti "follows after," vanas- "desire," vanati "desires, loves, wins;" Avestan vanaiti "he wishes, is victorious;" Latin venerari "to worship," venus "love, sexual desire; loveliness, beauty;" Old English wynn "joy," wunian "to dwell," wenian "to accustom, train, wean," wyscan "to wish."
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irreverent (adj.)
"deficient in veneration or respect," mid-15c., from Old French irreverent or directly from Latin irreverentem "disrespectful, irreverent" (see irreverence). Related: Irreverently (early 15c.); irreverential. Irreverend (late 15c.) means "not worthy of respect or veneration."
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yoni (n.)
1799, from Sanskrit, "female sexual principle as an object of veneration," literally "vulva, womb."
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mystique (n.)

1891, "atmosphere of mystery and veneration," from French mystique "a mystic; mystical," from Latin mysticus (see mystic (adj.)).

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juju (n.1)
object of religious veneration among West Africans, 1860, supposedly ultimately from French joujou "toy, plaything."
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Mariolatry (n.)

"worship of the Virgin Mary," usually implying idolatrous or improper veneration, 1610s, from Mary + -latry "worship of," with connective element -o-. Related: Mariolater; Mariolatrous.

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revere (v.)

"regard with deep respect and veneration," 1660s, from French révérer, from Latin revereri "revere, fear," from re-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see re-), + vereri "stand in awe of, fear, respect" (from PIE root *wer- (3) "perceive, watch out for"). Reverence was the earlier form of the verb. Related: Revered; revering.

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awe (n.)

c. 1300, aue, "fear, terror, great reverence," earlier aghe, c. 1200, from a Scandinavian source, such as Old Norse agi "fright;" from Proto-Germanic *agiz- (source also of Old English ege "fear," Old High German agiso "fright, terror," Gothic agis "fear, anguish"), from PIE *agh-es- (source also of Greek akhos "pain, grief"), from root *agh- (1) "to be depressed, be afraid" (see ail). Current sense of "dread mixed with admiration or veneration" is due to biblical use with reference to the Supreme Being. To stand in awe (early 15c.) originally was simply to stand awe. Awe-inspiring is recorded from 1814.

Al engelond of him stod awe.
["The Lay of Havelok the Dane," c. 1300]
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