Etymology
Advertisement
veneer (n.)
1702, from German Furnier, from furnieren "to cover with a veneer, inlay," from French fournir "to furnish, accomplish," from Middle French fornir "to furnish," from a Germanic source (compare Old High German frumjan "to provide;" see furnish). From German to French to German to English. Figurative sense of "mere outward show of some good quality" is attested from 1868.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
veneer (v.)
1728 (earlier fineer, 1708), from German furnieren (see veneer (n.)). Related: Veneered; veneering.
Related entries & more 
placard (n.)

late 15c., "formal document authenticated by an affixed seal" (a sense now obsolete), from Old French placquard "official document with a large, flat seal" (14c.), also "plate of armor;" ultimately from Middle Dutch, either from Middle Dutch plackaerd or via the French verb plaquier "to lay on, cover up, plaster over," from Middle Dutch placken "to patch (a garment), to plaster," related to Middle High German placke "patch, stain," German Placken "spot, patch."

The meaning "written or printed paper displaying some proclamation or announcement, intended to be posted in a public place to attract attention" is attested in English by 1550s; this sense is in French from 15c. As a verb, "to put placards upon," by 1813.

Compare plack, a low-value Scottish coin of 15c.-16c., from Old French plaque, name of a coin, literally "slab, plate, patch, veneer, etc.," from Middle Dutch placke, name of a coin, also "a thin slice."

Related entries & more