Etymology
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veil (v.)
late 14c., from Old French veler, voiller (12c.), from Latin velare "to cover, veil," from velum "a cloth, covering, curtain, veil," literally "a sail" (see veil (n.)). Figurative sense of "to conceal, mask, disguise" (something immaterial) is recorded from 1530s. Related: Veiled; veiling.
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veil (n.)
c. 1200, "nun's head covering," from Anglo-French and Old North French veil (12c., Modern French voile) "a head-covering," also "a sail, a curtain," from Latin vela, plural of velum "sail, curtain, covering," from PIE root *weg- (1) "to weave a web." Vela was mistaken in Vulgar Latin for a feminine singular noun. To take the veil "become a nun" is attested from early 14c.
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voile (n.)

thin material used for women's dresses, 1882, from French voile "veil" (see veil (n.)).

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velum (n.)
"the soft palate," 1771, from Latin velum "a sail, awning, curtain, covering" (see veil (n.)).
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vexillology (n.)
"study of flags," 1959, from Latin vexillum "flag, military ensign, banner" (from velum "a sail, curtain, veil; see veil (n.)) + -ology.
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unveil (v.)
1590s, in reference to sight, "to make clear," from un- (2) "opposite of" + veil (v.). Sense of "to display or reveal" (something) is from 1650s. Related: Unveiled; unveiling.
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velar (adj.)
1726, from Latin velaris, from velum "sail, curtain" (see veil (n.)). Originally an architect's term for a type of cupola resembling a swelling sail; phonetics sense is from 1876, on notion of "pertaining to the velum," the anatomist's name for the soft palate (velum in this sense is attested from 1771, in full velum palati). The noun meaning "a velar guttural" is recorded from 1886.
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reveal (v.)

c. 1400, revelen, "disclose, divulge, make known (supernaturally or by divine agency, as religious truth)," from Old French reveler "reveal" (14c.), from Latin revelare "reveal, uncover, disclose," literally "unveil," from re- "back, again," here probably indicating "opposite of" or transition to an opposite state (see re-) + velare "to cover, veil," from velum "a veil" (see veil (n.)). Related: Revealed; revealer; revealing. Meaning "display, make clear or visible, expose to sight" is from c. 1500.

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sunshade (n.)
1842, from sun (n.) + shade (n.). Old English had sunsceadu "veil."
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chador (n.)

"cloth worn as a shawl by women in Iran," 1884, from Persian chadar "tent, mantle, scarf, veil, sheet, table-cloth."

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