Etymology
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vehicle (n.)

1610s, "a medium through which a drug or medicine is administered," also "any means of conveying or transmitting," from French véhicule (16c.), from Latin vehiculum "means of transport, vehicle, carriage, conveyance," from vehere "to bear, carry, convey" (from PIE root *wegh- "to go, move, transport in a vehicle," which also is the source of English wagon). Sense of "cart or other conveyance" in English first recorded 1650s.

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vehicular (adj.)
"pertaining to vehicles," 1610s, from Late Latin vehicularis, from vehiculum "a vehicle" (see vehicle).
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*wegh- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to go, move, transport in a vehicle."

The root wegh-, "to convey, especially by wheeled vehicle," is found in virtually every branch of Indo-European, including now Anatolian. The root, as well as other widely represented roots such as aks- and nobh-, attests to the presence of the wheel — and vehicles using it — at the time Proto-Indo-European was spoken. [Watkins, p. 96]

It forms all or part of: always; away; convection; convey; convex; convoy; deviate; devious; envoy; evection; earwig; foy; graywacke; impervious; invective; inveigh; invoice; Norway; obviate; obvious; ochlocracy; ogee; pervious; previous; provection; quadrivium; thalweg; trivia; trivial; trivium; vector; vehemence; vehement; vehicle; vex; via; viaduct; viatic; viaticum; vogue; voyage; wacke; wag; waggish; wagon; wain; wall-eyed; wave (n.); way; wee; weigh; weight; wey; wiggle.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit vahati "carries, conveys," vahitram, vahanam "vessel, ship;" Avestan vazaiti "he leads, draws;" Greek okhos "carriage, chariot;" Latin vehere "to carry, convey," vehiculum "carriage, chariot;" Old Church Slavonic vesti "to carry, convey," vozŭ "carriage, chariot;" Russian povozka "small sled;" Lithuanian vežu, vežti "to carry, convey," važis "a small sled;" Old Irish fecht "campaign, journey," fen "carriage, cart;" Welsh gwain "carriage, cart;" Old English wegan "to carry;" Old Norse vegr, Old High German weg "way;" Middle Dutch wagen "wagon."

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RV (n.)
short for recreational vehicle, by 1967.
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amtrac (n.)
amphibious assault vehicle, 1944, contraction of amphibious tractor (n.).
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ATV (n.)

1969, acronym of all-terrain vehicle, which is attested by 1968.

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automatic (n.)

1902, "automatic weapon," from automatic (adj.). Meaning "motorized vehicle with automatic transmission" is from 1949.

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upset (n.)
early 15c., "insurrection," from upset (v.). Meaning "overturning of a vehicle or boat" is recorded from 1804.
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no-fault (adj.)
as a type of U.S. motor vehicle insurance, 1967, from no + fault (n.).
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SUV 
by 1988, abbreviation of sport/utility vehicle (itself attested from 1982).
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